11 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

A Star Is Born was among the biggest successes in the careers of Barbara Streisand and Kris Kristofferson, but ironically the accompanying soundtrack is an anomaly in the catalogs of both artists. Kristofferson was a literary folksinger and counterculture icon, while Streisand was the grand diva of stage music. Because both singers were playing rock stars in the film, the soundtrack gave them the opportunity to inhabit new roles. It’s great fun to witness Kristofferson take on the sweaty arena rock of “Watch Closely Now” and “Hellacious Acres,” let alone the string-laden balladry of “Lost Inside You,” which is about as far removed from “Me and Bobby McGee” as music gets. Both singers are in good voice, but this is really Streisand’s show. She excels at playing the disco Madame on the sultry “Queen Bee” and the uptempo “I Believe In Love.” However, “Evergreen” is the album’s eternal signature. Co-written by Paul Williams, it lives midway between the pastoral singer-songwriters of the early ‘70s and the grandest tradition of Hollywood balladry.

EDITORS’ NOTES

A Star Is Born was among the biggest successes in the careers of Barbara Streisand and Kris Kristofferson, but ironically the accompanying soundtrack is an anomaly in the catalogs of both artists. Kristofferson was a literary folksinger and counterculture icon, while Streisand was the grand diva of stage music. Because both singers were playing rock stars in the film, the soundtrack gave them the opportunity to inhabit new roles. It’s great fun to witness Kristofferson take on the sweaty arena rock of “Watch Closely Now” and “Hellacious Acres,” let alone the string-laden balladry of “Lost Inside You,” which is about as far removed from “Me and Bobby McGee” as music gets. Both singers are in good voice, but this is really Streisand’s show. She excels at playing the disco Madame on the sultry “Queen Bee” and the uptempo “I Believe In Love.” However, “Evergreen” is the album’s eternal signature. Co-written by Paul Williams, it lives midway between the pastoral singer-songwriters of the early ‘70s and the grandest tradition of Hollywood balladry.

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