9 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Electric bassist Mark Egan has worked with an array of players, including Pat Metheny, Pat Martino, and Larry Coryell. (And those are just guitarists.) On About Now, he's joined by drummer and longtime pal Danny Gottlieb (from their band Elemental) and keyboardist Mitchel Foreman. This set of originals is firmly in the modern electric jazz spectrum. Sometimes this is of the funky variety (the slow-grooving “McKenzie Portage” and “Slinky”); sometimes it's more in line with smooth and poppy (the uptempo “Sailing”). Sometimes it’s a surging brand of fusion (“Tea in Tiananmen Square”). Going into New Age territory, “Little Pagoda” has a sustained ambient feel, with a gentle melody carried by Egan and Foreman. Perhaps the strongest composition here, “About Now,” is one of the briefer forays, but it covers a lot of emotional ground with fine solos from both Egan and Foreman. Happily, everyone seems to be on good behavior here, setting aside wankery for melody, texture, and nuance. That isn’t something you can always say about an electric jazz album.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Electric bassist Mark Egan has worked with an array of players, including Pat Metheny, Pat Martino, and Larry Coryell. (And those are just guitarists.) On About Now, he's joined by drummer and longtime pal Danny Gottlieb (from their band Elemental) and keyboardist Mitchel Foreman. This set of originals is firmly in the modern electric jazz spectrum. Sometimes this is of the funky variety (the slow-grooving “McKenzie Portage” and “Slinky”); sometimes it's more in line with smooth and poppy (the uptempo “Sailing”). Sometimes it’s a surging brand of fusion (“Tea in Tiananmen Square”). Going into New Age territory, “Little Pagoda” has a sustained ambient feel, with a gentle melody carried by Egan and Foreman. Perhaps the strongest composition here, “About Now,” is one of the briefer forays, but it covers a lot of emotional ground with fine solos from both Egan and Foreman. Happily, everyone seems to be on good behavior here, setting aside wankery for melody, texture, and nuance. That isn’t something you can always say about an electric jazz album.

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About Mark Egan

Mark Egan, who has a floating sound, is best-known for his leadership of Elements with drummer Danny Gottlieb. His first instrument was the trumpet, switching to bass at 16. Egan played with Ira Sullivan's group in Miami from 1974 to 1976 and then moved to New York where he toured with the Pointer Sisters and David Sanborn. Egan's big break was when he became a member of the Pat Metheny Group (1977-1980), recording and touring extensively. Since leaving Metheny, he has worked in many situations, including with Stan Getz, Jim Hall, the Gil Evans Orchestra (1983-1985), and John McLaughlin. Elements, which usually also features Bill Evans on reeds and keyboardist Clifford Carter, was formed in 1982 and has existed on a part-time basis ever since, recording for Philo, Antilles, Novus, and Bluemoon. ~ Scott Yanow

HOMETOWN
Brockton, MA
GENRE
Jazz
BORN
January 14, 1951

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