8 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

By the late '70s, Bill Bruford had already earned a lofty rep as a premier prog-rock drummer for his work with Yes and King Crimson, among others. But the band that bore his name marked his first project as a leader. This 1979 live set from the BBC's Rock Goes to College TV show finds the fledgling fusion band burning up the stage. Recorded right before the release of the band's second album, One of a Kind, it features visceral takes on tunes from the band's first two records. Allan Holdsworth (who, like Bruford, had recently split from the supergroup U.K.) was already well on his way to guitar-hero status. Listening to his furious fretwork on "Beelzebub" and the subtler, jazzy shadings on "Forever Until Sunday," it's easy to hear why. Keyboardist Dave Stewart (not the Eurythmics member) provides electronic freakouts ("5G") and lyrical lead synth lines alike, and the set's two vocal tunes feature the laconic but luminous tones of celebrated solo artist Annette Peacock. In the waning phase of jazz-rock's heyday, this hot set proved that fusion could be as hard-hitting as it was heady.

EDITORS’ NOTES

By the late '70s, Bill Bruford had already earned a lofty rep as a premier prog-rock drummer for his work with Yes and King Crimson, among others. But the band that bore his name marked his first project as a leader. This 1979 live set from the BBC's Rock Goes to College TV show finds the fledgling fusion band burning up the stage. Recorded right before the release of the band's second album, One of a Kind, it features visceral takes on tunes from the band's first two records. Allan Holdsworth (who, like Bruford, had recently split from the supergroup U.K.) was already well on his way to guitar-hero status. Listening to his furious fretwork on "Beelzebub" and the subtler, jazzy shadings on "Forever Until Sunday," it's easy to hear why. Keyboardist Dave Stewart (not the Eurythmics member) provides electronic freakouts ("5G") and lyrical lead synth lines alike, and the set's two vocal tunes feature the laconic but luminous tones of celebrated solo artist Annette Peacock. In the waning phase of jazz-rock's heyday, this hot set proved that fusion could be as hard-hitting as it was heady.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.9 out of 5
10 Ratings
10 Ratings
MindEraser ,

This is

a truly great 70s jazz-rock fusion ensemble. there is pure creative energy and technical mastery that is displayed on this cd.Holdsworths guitar playing will interest any guitar player.he has some great liquid legato lines, fluid finger vibrato, idiosyncratic whammy articulations, atypically voiced chords and arpeggios and his great style of singing are very present. "5G" has a mind blowing slapping solo. "the sahara of snow part 1" and "forever until sunday" have some great synth and electronics that are played by stewart. but every song on this cd is great.

filmaddict ,

Takes me back

I saw Bruford at a club with maybe a couple hundred other people in the 1980s. Alas, by then Holdsworth was gone (why doesn't this guy stick with a band? Only 1 UK album also!) but the combo still kicked butt. This set is just as on fire. Jeff Berlin is amazing as is of course Bruford himself.

Hudson Boyd ,

Bruford Has it!!!

Are you kidding me! Bruford and Alan, what a pair. This is fusion at it's best. Words can't describe it but Bruford has always been a great musician. Nothing else to say...Hudson Boyd

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