19 Songs, 1 Hour 17 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ocean of Confusion tracks the period of Screaming Trees’ musical maturity, starting in 1989 with Buzz Factory and continuing to 1996, when the release of Dust confirmed the Trees' stature as the pre-eminent psychedelic band of the grunge era. Mark Lanegan—whose courage and vulnerability as a vocalist was the group's most defining trait—personally selected the songs. Aside from their biggest rock songs (“Ocean of Confusion,” “For Celebrations Past,” the still-magnificent hit “Nearly Lost You”), the compilation also shows how much the Trees did to subvert grunge conventions. Little touches like the brass section on “Disappearing” and the flutes of “Traveler” showed that their interests lay far outside the boundaries of hard rock. Lanegan was always a frontman more in the mold of Jim Morrison and Lee Hazlewood than Robert Plant, and the two unreleased songs here show him at his brooding best. “Watchpocket Blues” and “Paperback Bible” both start with deceptively slow passages before building to throttling choruses. Pop smarts, psychedelic inventiveness, and impassioned choruses: Screaming Trees had it all. This is the proof.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ocean of Confusion tracks the period of Screaming Trees’ musical maturity, starting in 1989 with Buzz Factory and continuing to 1996, when the release of Dust confirmed the Trees' stature as the pre-eminent psychedelic band of the grunge era. Mark Lanegan—whose courage and vulnerability as a vocalist was the group's most defining trait—personally selected the songs. Aside from their biggest rock songs (“Ocean of Confusion,” “For Celebrations Past,” the still-magnificent hit “Nearly Lost You”), the compilation also shows how much the Trees did to subvert grunge conventions. Little touches like the brass section on “Disappearing” and the flutes of “Traveler” showed that their interests lay far outside the boundaries of hard rock. Lanegan was always a frontman more in the mold of Jim Morrison and Lee Hazlewood than Robert Plant, and the two unreleased songs here show him at his brooding best. “Watchpocket Blues” and “Paperback Bible” both start with deceptively slow passages before building to throttling choruses. Pop smarts, psychedelic inventiveness, and impassioned choruses: Screaming Trees had it all. This is the proof.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
18 Ratings
18 Ratings
spicoli123 ,

Good, but.....

Why is it on Chris Cornell's page?

MADSKILLZ!!!!!!!!! ,

Good stuff...

Yes, Chris Cornell was somewhat of a producer with these guys, that's why this shows up on his iTunes page, clearly from the vocals, you can tell he's not the singer. With that aside, you should get this if you're a big grunge fan. These guys only had one hit, but they've got some good tunes. They were more of a cult band, but didn't change the scene in a way that Pearl Jam or Nirvana did. Still a lot of cool songs in here, and they're long songs, so you're getting a lot for your money.

Wufs ,

Get "Dust" instead

I only have the last two Trees albums and the SST Anthology. The SST stuff is just OK, "Sweet Oblivion" is quite good though a bit meat-and-potatoes for my taste, but "Dust" is a gem. The tracks this collection picks from "Sweet Oblivion" are all excellent, and I'm sure you could do a lot worse than to start here. But why did they include the only two mediocre tracks from "Dust" ("Make My Mind" and "Witness") at the expense of, say, "All I Know" or "Halo of Ashes"? Believe me, the group's final release, "Dust" - which went largely unnoticed at the time - is well worth getting, and if you're inclined to pick up a physical copy, it can be had at cutout prices. On the other hand, if you have already ponied up for "Ocean of Confusion" you know what to get next.

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