19 Songs, 1 Hour 17 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ocean of Confusion tracks the period of Screaming Trees’ musical maturity, starting in 1989 with Buzz Factory and continuing to 1996, when the release of Dust confirmed the Trees' stature as the pre-eminent psychedelic band of the grunge era. Mark Lanegan—whose courage and vulnerability as a vocalist was the group's most defining trait—personally selected the songs. Aside from their biggest rock songs (“Ocean of Confusion,” “For Celebrations Past,” the still-magnificent hit “Nearly Lost You”), the compilation also shows how much the Trees did to subvert grunge conventions. Little touches like the brass section on “Disappearing” and the flutes of “Traveler” showed that their interests lay far outside the boundaries of hard rock. Lanegan was always a frontman more in the mold of Jim Morrison and Lee Hazlewood than Robert Plant, and the two unreleased songs here show him at his brooding best. “Watchpocket Blues” and “Paperback Bible” both start with deceptively slow passages before building to throttling choruses. Pop smarts, psychedelic inventiveness, and impassioned choruses: Screaming Trees had it all. This is the proof.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ocean of Confusion tracks the period of Screaming Trees’ musical maturity, starting in 1989 with Buzz Factory and continuing to 1996, when the release of Dust confirmed the Trees' stature as the pre-eminent psychedelic band of the grunge era. Mark Lanegan—whose courage and vulnerability as a vocalist was the group's most defining trait—personally selected the songs. Aside from their biggest rock songs (“Ocean of Confusion,” “For Celebrations Past,” the still-magnificent hit “Nearly Lost You”), the compilation also shows how much the Trees did to subvert grunge conventions. Little touches like the brass section on “Disappearing” and the flutes of “Traveler” showed that their interests lay far outside the boundaries of hard rock. Lanegan was always a frontman more in the mold of Jim Morrison and Lee Hazlewood than Robert Plant, and the two unreleased songs here show him at his brooding best. “Watchpocket Blues” and “Paperback Bible” both start with deceptively slow passages before building to throttling choruses. Pop smarts, psychedelic inventiveness, and impassioned choruses: Screaming Trees had it all. This is the proof.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
18 Ratings
18 Ratings
Jimenides ,

Not As Good As I Was Expecting

I bought this album purely because of Mark Lanegan. His voice is THE voice. However, I wasn't necessarily blown away by the music on this compilation like I was expecting to be. Perhaps it's because I prefer the older Mark's deeper more powerful vocals. IDK. One pleasant surprise was my discovery of Barrett Martin, who is a fantastic drummer. I am in love with his fills and catchy beats. Unfortuneately I can't say the same about the Conner brothers, who definitely underwhelmed. Sure, there were some decent guitar solos, but on the whole the guitars sounded more like "noise" than music to me, which I guess is in part due to the psychedlic influence of their earlier music.

GTHobbes ,

Love the Trees

Great compilation from one of the most underrated American rock bands of all time. Can't wait for the new "lost songs" album this week. I'll be playing the Trees until I'm dead.

Jackie3609 ,

Good Album

But I think Dust was a bit better. Of course Nearly Lost You is one of the better songs on this album, but besides that one, my favorites would be shadow of the season, dollar bill, and dying days.

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