13 Songs, 36 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Elvis Costello’s 1977 debut album is a literate, poppy-punk masterpiece, and then some. Yes, it tears through angry, pointed material—from sneering looks at the daily grind (“Welcome to the Working Week”) to mocking impossible standards of others (“Miracle Man”). It also mellows on a signature ballad that’s tough and tender (“Alison”), and the delectably spare and weirdly noir-ish “Watching the Detectives” is a mark of songwriting genius. While Costello’s lyrics cut like killer short stories, his musical knowledge is only partly displayed here, which makes the melodic brilliance even more remarkable.

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Elvis Costello’s 1977 debut album is a literate, poppy-punk masterpiece, and then some. Yes, it tears through angry, pointed material—from sneering looks at the daily grind (“Welcome to the Working Week”) to mocking impossible standards of others (“Miracle Man”). It also mellows on a signature ballad that’s tough and tender (“Alison”), and the delectably spare and weirdly noir-ish “Watching the Detectives” is a mark of songwriting genius. While Costello’s lyrics cut like killer short stories, his musical knowledge is only partly displayed here, which makes the melodic brilliance even more remarkable.

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.9 out of 5
20 Ratings
20 Ratings
1 Eyed Tom ,

Indispensable!

My Aim Is true, along with This years Model and Armed Forces are not only Elvis’s best but indispensable in any serious Rock/Alt/Punk collection. He is at his best with the Attractions and when Nick Lowe produces.There are so many unforgettable songs on this album and it seems timeless. I was so fortunate to see them several times during this period and their performances and energy, like their music was unforgettable.

robusto the perfect ,

robusto

the greatest of lyrical works ever

The WyzenHymer ,

Some 40 Years Later...

And it is STILL one of the 5 best “debut” albums ever recorded. Each song is burned into the memory of any person who, when it came out, put the record on the turntable ...and when side 2 had ended, immediately flipped the record over to listen to side 1 all over AGAIN. To put things in perspective, in late ‘77 young minds were being numbed by major label tripe from acts like Andy Gibb, Shawn Cassidy, Barbara Streisand and Debby Boone. Then in November of ‘77 at local record stores, young ears heard “Watching the Detectives,” “Mystery Dance” and “I’m Not Angry” for the first time - and most knew that they NEEDED this important record (or cassette) and that “popular” music and all of its associated trappings had just gone in a completely new direction. This record became the entry point into the “punk/new wave” scene for a great many American youths - but because it was such an outstanding effort, it made it extremely difficult for the “punk/new wave” acts that followed, as precious few were unable to come close to matching Costello’s lyrical intelligence and imagery. In addition to Costello’s prowess, his backing band - the Attractions- were each outstanding musicians in their own right, led by the brilliant and incomparable keyboardist Steve Nieve (Nason).

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