11 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Looking over this 11-song retrospective of Free’s short-lived career, it’s easy to identify the band’s roots. For all their beef, songs like “I’m a Mover” and “Walk in My Shadow” are essentially British blues tunes—but we should all be thankful that Free quickly moved beyond the influences of John Mayall and Alexis Korner. Free took the electrical current of Jimi Hendrix and the howling urgency of The Small Faces and made something that was entirely its own. Free's members came of age in the '60s, but “All Right Now” marks the start of hard rock in the '70s. It’s one of those elemental rock songs that will never die, but its power and simplicity come from something that can't be easily duplicated. Paul Rodgers was a magnificent frontman with a once-in-a-lifetime voice, but a less-appreciated and far more crucial element is Free’s sense of timing. More specifically, its sense of patience. At a time when every new rock group was trying to out-wail, out-note, and out-freak one another, the slow, unadorned grooves of “Fire and Water,” “Heavy Load," and “I’ll Be Creepin’” spoke louder than anyone else.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Looking over this 11-song retrospective of Free’s short-lived career, it’s easy to identify the band’s roots. For all their beef, songs like “I’m a Mover” and “Walk in My Shadow” are essentially British blues tunes—but we should all be thankful that Free quickly moved beyond the influences of John Mayall and Alexis Korner. Free took the electrical current of Jimi Hendrix and the howling urgency of The Small Faces and made something that was entirely its own. Free's members came of age in the '60s, but “All Right Now” marks the start of hard rock in the '70s. It’s one of those elemental rock songs that will never die, but its power and simplicity come from something that can't be easily duplicated. Paul Rodgers was a magnificent frontman with a once-in-a-lifetime voice, but a less-appreciated and far more crucial element is Free’s sense of timing. More specifically, its sense of patience. At a time when every new rock group was trying to out-wail, out-note, and out-freak one another, the slow, unadorned grooves of “Fire and Water,” “Heavy Load," and “I’ll Be Creepin’” spoke louder than anyone else.

TITLE TIME
2:57
3:31
3:29
3:58
5:34
5:21
3:15
6:12
3:28
3:42
4:38

Ratings and Reviews

4.2 out of 5

64 Ratings

64 Ratings

Don't Think, Feel...

My Brother Jake

This, as the other album review says, has nothing to do with comparisons, let alone to Led Zepplin. This is FREE. Great singing, great drums, great bass and Paul Kossoff. Kossoff left-hand vibrato is the stuff of legend. Clapton sought him out to find the secret.

In a time of manufactured music, manufactured fame and little talent....this is a great place to start to find your way to some of the best music. Was good, Still is.

Brant

EastSideWalker

if you really like free there is another guy named brant bjork that sounds exactly like free. they are both really good.

Unforgettable Rock and Roll

R&R

This cd is as good as they come. It unsettles me that the top six downloads of Free are "All Right Now''. I love that song, but there so much good music on this album that is easily as good. For me, it's all about "I'm a Mover'' and "Wishing Well". The opener is a simple, almost Hendrix-like blues tune where Paul is beggining to find his bad a*s voice. "Wishing Well" has a riff that rivals "All Right Now" and it's epic lyrics are beautiful. Worth the buy just for the end of the song where they jam to that riff like no one else could. "Fire and Water" is also awesome, and the rest of the album is top-rate blues rock. This laid the foundations for all the epic 70's bands that similarly rocked the world.

About Free

Famed for their perennial "All Right Now," Free helped lay the foundations for the rise of hard rock, stripping the earthy sound of British blues down to its raw, minimalist core to pioneer a brand of proto-metal later popularized by 1970s superstars like Foreigner, Foghat and Bad Company. Free formed in London in 1968 when guitarist Paul Kossoff, then a member of the blues unit Black Cat Bones, was taken to see vocalist Paul Rodgers' group Brown Sugar by a friend, drummer Tom Mautner. After deciding to form their own band, Kossoff and Rodgers recruited drummer Simon Kirke (since Mautner was at university) and 16-year-old bass phenom Andy Fraser from the ranks of John Mayall's Bluesbreakers; with the aid of Alexis Korner, who also suggested the name Free, the fledgling band signed to the Island label, issuing their bluesy debut Tons of Sobs in 1968.

Free's eponymous 1969 follow-up expanded on their roots-based sound, incorporating rockers like Albert King's "The Hunter" as well as muscular ballads like "Lying in the Sunshine" into the mix. Although both of the first two albums fared poorly on the charts, 1970's Fire and Water became a tremendous hit on the strength of the primal "All Right Now," a Top Five smash powered by Rodgers' gritty, visceral vocals. After headlining 1970's Isle of Wight festival, the group appeared destined for superstardom, but the LP Highway did not fare nearly as well as anticipated, and after a grueling tour which yielded 1971's Free Live, the band dissolved amidst ego clashes and recriminations.

While Rodgers went on to form Peace and Fraser founded Toby, Kossoff and Kirke teamed with bassist Tetsu Yamauchi and keyboardist John "Rabbit" Bundrick to record the album Kossoff, Kirke, Tetsu and Rabbit. When none of these new projects proved successful, the original lineup of Free re-formed to record 1972's Free at Last, which launched the hit "Little Bit of Love." However, drug problems nagged the group, as Kossoff's longtime battle with heroin continued to worsen; soon Fraser exited to form Sharks with Chris Spedding, leaving Rodgers and Kirke to record the majority of 1973's Heartbreaker while a drug-addled Kossoff watched from the sidelines. Soon, the group disbanded again, this time for good: while Rodgers and Kirke went on to found Bad Company, Kossoff formed Back Street Crawler before dying of a drug-induced heart attack on March 19, 1976. ~ Jason Ankeny

  • ORIGIN
    London, England
  • GENRE
    Rock
  • FORMED
    1968

Songs

Albums

Listeners Also Bought