13 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With their first two albums, FIDLAR cemented their reputation as a quintessential West Coast party band. By pulling influences from garage rock, hip-hop, and skate punk (FIDLAR’s Max and Elvis Kuehn are sons of T.S.O.L.’s Greg Kuehn), they’ve adapted their anarchic pastiche to fit their rage first/ask questions later mentality. But after too many hangovers, the band teased the benefits of mental acuity on 2015’s Too—and now, Almost Free. Themes of mortality and vulnerability come up often. The quartet measure the time lost to the bottle on “By Myself” (“I never knew it felt good to cry,” goes one line). “Kick” captures a junkie’s remorse. K.Flay joins the search for meaningful connection on “Called You Twice.” They even open their worldview on “Thought. Mouth.,” taking shots at both sides of the political divide. As their temperament matures, so does their sound. “Flake” takes cues from The Black Keys, while “Scam Likely” drops in Memphis-style horns with echoes of CCR. Meanwhile, rowdy throwbacks “Alcohol” and “Get Off My Rock” feel like the last vestiges of FIDLAR 1.0.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With their first two albums, FIDLAR cemented their reputation as a quintessential West Coast party band. By pulling influences from garage rock, hip-hop, and skate punk (FIDLAR’s Max and Elvis Kuehn are sons of T.S.O.L.’s Greg Kuehn), they’ve adapted their anarchic pastiche to fit their rage first/ask questions later mentality. But after too many hangovers, the band teased the benefits of mental acuity on 2015’s Too—and now, Almost Free. Themes of mortality and vulnerability come up often. The quartet measure the time lost to the bottle on “By Myself” (“I never knew it felt good to cry,” goes one line). “Kick” captures a junkie’s remorse. K.Flay joins the search for meaningful connection on “Called You Twice.” They even open their worldview on “Thought. Mouth.,” taking shots at both sides of the political divide. As their temperament matures, so does their sound. “Flake” takes cues from The Black Keys, while “Scam Likely” drops in Memphis-style horns with echoes of CCR. Meanwhile, rowdy throwbacks “Alcohol” and “Get Off My Rock” feel like the last vestiges of FIDLAR 1.0.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.
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Ratings and Reviews

4.0 out of 5
26 Ratings
26 Ratings
Invertedsquid115 ,

Sad

It had so much potential. Every track other than what was released prior to this album has just boring riffs and even the ones that are great don’t go anywhere.

caleblivesay ,

Coming into their own

This albums spans so many different genres it’s sometimes hard to comprehend but each song takes advantage of this change in style to stick out. I previous thought that each FIDLAR album was good, but so uniform that I was hearing the same type of song over and over. Between the Rap Rock of the intro track to the Cake style groove of “By Myself” to the screams of “Too Real” this album stay true to the FIDLAR brand but allows for the band to experiment in a tremendous way. The second half falters a little from some songs that are as catchy as the first half, but overall this album is a gem. If you’re wanting to get a friend into FIDLAR, this might just be the perfect album to start with.

SPIKE.... ,

All over the place

There’s not much consistency on the album. Sometime that can be a good thing, but not in this case. Sometimes it sounds like a poor Beastie Boys impersonation, such as “Get off my Rock.” At other times it sounds like they’re trying to catch an 80’s pop rock vibe, such as “Scam Lately.” Either way, the lyrics are vacuous and the album doesn’t seem well thought out. Could have been good if they decided on a style, and not tried to please everyone.

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