17 Songs, 1 Hour

EDITORS’ NOTES

What's notable about this collection of Pure Prairie League songs is that they remembered to sequence "Falling In and Out of Love" right before "Amie," as was originally done on "Bustin' Out," their 1972 debut album. The former ditty is a bittersweet lament with a chorus that ties right in with the latter hit "Amie" (easily the band's best known song). The rest of the collection abounds with '70s moustache rock boasting lofty, flawless, vocal harmonies that aspired to sound like those of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. But since Pure Prairie League hailed from Columbus, Ohio instead of Los Angeles, many of the songs here forego the hipster trappings prevalent in the music of their West Coast contemporaries in lieu of more earnest and heartfelt tunes about human relationships, like "Tears." Upon listening to these songs you may wonder how a band this indicative of the '70s could not have a song titled "Lady." Not to worry, the romantically rocking "Woman" more than makes up for it with guitars that distort like Crazy Horse and a chorus that begs, "Time's so short/ Please woman, wear your hair down for me."

EDITORS’ NOTES

What's notable about this collection of Pure Prairie League songs is that they remembered to sequence "Falling In and Out of Love" right before "Amie," as was originally done on "Bustin' Out," their 1972 debut album. The former ditty is a bittersweet lament with a chorus that ties right in with the latter hit "Amie" (easily the band's best known song). The rest of the collection abounds with '70s moustache rock boasting lofty, flawless, vocal harmonies that aspired to sound like those of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. But since Pure Prairie League hailed from Columbus, Ohio instead of Los Angeles, many of the songs here forego the hipster trappings prevalent in the music of their West Coast contemporaries in lieu of more earnest and heartfelt tunes about human relationships, like "Tears." Upon listening to these songs you may wonder how a band this indicative of the '70s could not have a song titled "Lady." Not to worry, the romantically rocking "Woman" more than makes up for it with guitars that distort like Crazy Horse and a chorus that begs, "Time's so short/ Please woman, wear your hair down for me."

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