11 Songs, 29 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Considering punk rock and its endless permutations have been with us for decades, it's no surprise that musicians working the neighborhood embrace and attack the form, often simultaneously. The melodies come quickly. The chords fall in line more swiftly. But then a decision must be made: does a group keep it simple or try to unlock something new? The Los Angeles–based art-punk duo No Age always has catchy melodies; it's what it does to them that makes things interesting. "I Won't Be Your Generator," "Lock Box," and "C'mon, Stimulating" have the guts of Ramones songs tucked inside the chaos, but the dirty mixes and haphazard recording methods ensure the appeal is either enhanced or rubbed raw. It's a matter of how attached one is to traditional presentations and why potential fans need to be okay with the "art" aspect of art-punk. For example, "An Impression" and "Running from a Go-Go" are No Age's ballads, where simple guitar parts melt into sawing instruments and vocals make little attempt to be heard over the orchestral-junkyard weave.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Considering punk rock and its endless permutations have been with us for decades, it's no surprise that musicians working the neighborhood embrace and attack the form, often simultaneously. The melodies come quickly. The chords fall in line more swiftly. But then a decision must be made: does a group keep it simple or try to unlock something new? The Los Angeles–based art-punk duo No Age always has catchy melodies; it's what it does to them that makes things interesting. "I Won't Be Your Generator," "Lock Box," and "C'mon, Stimulating" have the guts of Ramones songs tucked inside the chaos, but the dirty mixes and haphazard recording methods ensure the appeal is either enhanced or rubbed raw. It's a matter of how attached one is to traditional presentations and why potential fans need to be okay with the "art" aspect of art-punk. For example, "An Impression" and "Running from a Go-Go" are No Age's ballads, where simple guitar parts melt into sawing instruments and vocals make little attempt to be heard over the orchestral-junkyard weave.

TITLE TIME
2:31
3:18
3:14
3:04
2:30
2:05
3:04
0:56
2:20
2:35
4:03

About No Age

Los Angeles experimental lo-fi drum-and-guitar duo No Age are Dean Spunt and Randy Randall, ex-members of hardcore band Wives. Through assorted indie labels, No Age released limited runs of vinyl-only EPs before collecting many of those tracks for the singles collection Weirdo Rippers, issued by U.K. label FatCat in summer 2007. The record's cover pays respect to the Smell, a venue/art space they felt was partially responsible for the livelihood of both No Age and Wives. The duo is also known for its videos, performance art, and visual art, as well as curating an exhibition that included works by Devendra Banhart and others. The band moved to Sub Pop in 2008 and released its full-fledged debut album, Nouns. Partly recorded at Southern Studios in London, Nouns saw the band add a pop flavor to its hardcore punk assault and was widely critically acclaimed, charting highly on many best-of-year lists. The group's sophomore effort, Everything in Between, followed in 2010, and in between albums and tours they remained busy with other art projects, including a performance alongside video artist Doug Aitken and actress Chloë Sevigny of the multimedia installation piece Black Mirror on the Greek island of Hydra in June 2011. In 2013 they recorded their third album, An Object, a conceptual work as much about the process and texture of music-making as about the music itself, with every single aspect of production and design handled by the bandmembers themselves. After a three-year gap it transpired that No Age had parted ways with Sub Pop, moving to Drag City Records for the release of their fourth studio album, Snares Like a Haircut, in 2018. ~ Kenyon Hopkin

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