300 Songs, 21 Hours 15 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

From 1971 through to the day The Rolling Stones call it quits is considered the legendary band's second era. Their early manager Allen Klein owns the rights to everything the band released up to Sticky Fingers (on which the band co-own certain tracks); that's why their music is divided along these lines. In 1971, the band formed their own Rolling Stones Records through Atlantic Records and have since brought their catalog with them to every new label. This "collection" features all their studio albums, including Exile on Main St. and Some Girls in their most recent deluxe editions, plus their many live albums. A few unincluded b-sides and trivial tracks aside, this features the classic band adapting to the marketplace they helped create. Sticky Fingers, Exile on Main St., and Some Girls are classic albums, but Goats Head Soup, Emotional Rescue, and Tattoo You are often underrated. Every studio album has hidden treasures, while live albums such as Stripped re-ignite the Stones' classics as only they can.

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

From 1971 through to the day The Rolling Stones call it quits is considered the legendary band's second era. Their early manager Allen Klein owns the rights to everything the band released up to Sticky Fingers (on which the band co-own certain tracks); that's why their music is divided along these lines. In 1971, the band formed their own Rolling Stones Records through Atlantic Records and have since brought their catalog with them to every new label. This "collection" features all their studio albums, including Exile on Main St. and Some Girls in their most recent deluxe editions, plus their many live albums. A few unincluded b-sides and trivial tracks aside, this features the classic band adapting to the marketplace they helped create. Sticky Fingers, Exile on Main St., and Some Girls are classic albums, but Goats Head Soup, Emotional Rescue, and Tattoo You are often underrated. Every studio album has hidden treasures, while live albums such as Stripped re-ignite the Stones' classics as only they can.

Mastered for iTunes
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Ratings and Reviews

3.6 out of 5
87 Ratings
87 Ratings
Uncle Elijah ,

This isn't "Really" complete.

Why don't they make a complete collection of The Rolling Stones in chronological order that includes singles, B-sides, studio outtakes, demos, albums, full concerts, pictures, live footage, documentary, interviews, articles, EPs, compilations, live albums, and a title that says "The Rolling Stones: Complete". It would span from their first singles and demos to now. EVERYTHING in between. This isn't even their entire time span. Don't rebuy this if you already have these albums. It's the same exact thing!

Music supervisor ,

Not bad, but missing an essential collection for Stones fans

Without even attempting to be overly purist, I do think the one record they could have put tracks from is "Sucking In The Seventies." This record came out in '81, I believe, and while most of the songs can be found on other albums, there are some crucial non-album b-sides contained within the collection, etc.

Cases in point:

* "Everything Is Turning To Gold," which you can only find on Sucking In The Seventies, was originally the non-album b-side to the single for "Shattered" (from Some Girls).

* Sucking In the Seventies also had "Dance Pt. 2," which correlates to "Dance Pt. 1" on Emotional Rescue.

* You also don't get some of the tracks off of Rarities (1971-2003), a collection that came out in 2005. You get "Fancy Man Blues" (non-album b-side from Steel Wheels sessions). on that one, but not in this complete collection. And god knows if "Cook Cook Blues" (another non-album b-side from Steel Wheels) will ever see the light of day.

* And of course, no "Through The Lonely Nights" here either.

Adam Zappel ,

A review by a typical "completist".

This is the quintessential rock band. Their prolific body of work make them arguably the best.

Keith Richards' is a brother of the blues irrespective of skin color. Mick's charisma and voice rock. Charlie Watts is a decent bloody dummah, too. The mojo contributions by Brian Jones, Mick Taylor and Ronnie Woods along with all of the trials and tribulations of the band make the intangibles epic.

I have purchased Stones compilations before and quite frankly they sucked. But THIS collection (along with the 1963-1971 collection) with the complete albums and the cohesiveness they bring are better than the sum of their parts.

Keith Richards' LIFE (an autobiography) is a perfect compliment because it shines a light on the stuff going on behind the scenes. The man has cooked away much of his ego and is left with a cutting honesty that adds value to the STONES legacy.

If you are a casual fan or just curious, pass. But if you want to vibe with the whole story, this collection is a great start.

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