13 Songs, 59 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

On their sophomore album, Whiskey Myers wrap themselves in the Stars and Bars as they serve up unadulterated Southern rock with gusto. The Texas-bred quintet recalls the ‘70s heyday of Lynyrd Skynyrd, Molly Hatchet, and other guitar-centric Dixie combos. Six-string ferocity and an ornery vocal attitude give tunes like “Bar, Guitar and a Honky Tonk Crowd,” “Turn It Up," and “Strange Dreams” the bite of a junkyard Rottweiler jacked up on Jim Beam. The band shows off its blues-boogie instincts on the hard-slamming “Different Mold” and embrace acoustic country on the quietly searing “Song for You.” Lead singer Cody Cannon reins in his throat-shredding tendencies to deliver “Virginia” with surprising tenderness and lend “Broken Window Serenade” an almost Dylanesque folk quality. If the album has a centerpiece, it’s “Ballad of a Southern Man,” a heartfelt expression of down-home pride that’s comparable to Skynyrd’s “Sweet Home Alabama” in its mix of nostalgia and defiance. Producer Leroy Powell keeps the tracks sounding radio-ready without sanding down the band’s pugnacious edge.

EDITORS’ NOTES

On their sophomore album, Whiskey Myers wrap themselves in the Stars and Bars as they serve up unadulterated Southern rock with gusto. The Texas-bred quintet recalls the ‘70s heyday of Lynyrd Skynyrd, Molly Hatchet, and other guitar-centric Dixie combos. Six-string ferocity and an ornery vocal attitude give tunes like “Bar, Guitar and a Honky Tonk Crowd,” “Turn It Up," and “Strange Dreams” the bite of a junkyard Rottweiler jacked up on Jim Beam. The band shows off its blues-boogie instincts on the hard-slamming “Different Mold” and embrace acoustic country on the quietly searing “Song for You.” Lead singer Cody Cannon reins in his throat-shredding tendencies to deliver “Virginia” with surprising tenderness and lend “Broken Window Serenade” an almost Dylanesque folk quality. If the album has a centerpiece, it’s “Ballad of a Southern Man,” a heartfelt expression of down-home pride that’s comparable to Skynyrd’s “Sweet Home Alabama” in its mix of nostalgia and defiance. Producer Leroy Powell keeps the tracks sounding radio-ready without sanding down the band’s pugnacious edge.

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