35 Songs, 1 Hour 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

You could feel the collective head-scratching when word got out that the 10th volume of Bob Dylan's Bootleg Series was focusing on the years surrounding Nashville Skyline, Self-Portrait, and New Morning. While Skyline and Morning have their fans, Self-Portrait remains the most divisive double album in rock history (Lou Reed's Metal Machine Music excepted). Hadn't Dylan himself dismissed Self-Portrait? Yet one listen to the gorgeous "Pretty Saro" (where Dylan stretches his voice beyond its usual range) or the earthy "Railroad Bill," and it's obvious that once again the most fascinating musical artist of the 20th century proved that many of his best moments were left on cutting-room floors. Alternate takes of "I Threw It All Away" and "Country Pie," along with demos and overdub-free takes of Self-Portrait tracks, demand that listeners revisit those albums to hear what they misconstrued. The deluxe version includes Dylan and The Band's 1970 set at the Isle of Wight, while the standard issue features only a few peeks. The biggest tease, though? The Basement Tapes outtake of "Minstrel Boy"—is that Vol. 11 calling?

EDITORS’ NOTES

You could feel the collective head-scratching when word got out that the 10th volume of Bob Dylan's Bootleg Series was focusing on the years surrounding Nashville Skyline, Self-Portrait, and New Morning. While Skyline and Morning have their fans, Self-Portrait remains the most divisive double album in rock history (Lou Reed's Metal Machine Music excepted). Hadn't Dylan himself dismissed Self-Portrait? Yet one listen to the gorgeous "Pretty Saro" (where Dylan stretches his voice beyond its usual range) or the earthy "Railroad Bill," and it's obvious that once again the most fascinating musical artist of the 20th century proved that many of his best moments were left on cutting-room floors. Alternate takes of "I Threw It All Away" and "Country Pie," along with demos and overdub-free takes of Self-Portrait tracks, demand that listeners revisit those albums to hear what they misconstrued. The deluxe version includes Dylan and The Band's 1970 set at the Isle of Wight, while the standard issue features only a few peeks. The biggest tease, though? The Basement Tapes outtake of "Minstrel Boy"—is that Vol. 11 calling?

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Ratings and Reviews

4.2 out of 5
17 Ratings
17 Ratings
89Giantsfan ,

Better than the original

Every couple of years we get a bootleg series. This one is fun because of it's relation to the controversial "Self Portrait" of which Griel Marcus famously said "what is this S?" This stripped down version of the Self Portrait and New Morning songs (even a few with the band and some from Basement Tapes - are in many ways better than the originals. I'm glad Bob's letting us listen to these with a new set of ears. Check out the 12 minute doc they did on this on his website.

steplad ,

Great to hear this...

There will always be the naysayers, but I am happy to hear these cuts, even the minute and a half on itunes. It shows what Dylan has always said which is that he can really sing and hits all the notes. His style as shown here would be very ok in the music scene today, right there with the young singers and groups, not dated at all except maybe some lyrics. He's confident enough as an artist to put this out now and show that youthful purity of expression.

arjmd1951 ,

El Ripoff

All but two already recorded. Can't believe Bob had anything to do with this. Bob, fire who ever did this to your reputation.

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