11 Songs, 36 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Spoon's third album is a study in how to get a lot with a little: moody but deceptively raucous, it's also their most pared-down and eclectic. Songs like "Fitted Shirt" showed that the band had matured and broken away (sonically and songwriting-wise) from the early '90s smartypants postmodern milieu of Pavement and their ilk. That song alone has all the emotional resonance of a great song by Thin Lizzy, Creedence Clearwater Revival or Phil Ochs. Much of the album's lyrical content seems to deal with a breakup, however. The deceptively mellow "Everything Hits at Once" is an uncannily sober dissection of the sorrow of heartache while "10:20 AM" channels obsessed insomnia backed by a mellotron and acoustic guitar. At the time of this 2001 release, the Austin, TX-based trio had gone from a small label to a major then back to an indie again only to release what remains their most excellent and concerted effort, pound for pound.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Spoon's third album is a study in how to get a lot with a little: moody but deceptively raucous, it's also their most pared-down and eclectic. Songs like "Fitted Shirt" showed that the band had matured and broken away (sonically and songwriting-wise) from the early '90s smartypants postmodern milieu of Pavement and their ilk. That song alone has all the emotional resonance of a great song by Thin Lizzy, Creedence Clearwater Revival or Phil Ochs. Much of the album's lyrical content seems to deal with a breakup, however. The deceptively mellow "Everything Hits at Once" is an uncannily sober dissection of the sorrow of heartache while "10:20 AM" channels obsessed insomnia backed by a mellotron and acoustic guitar. At the time of this 2001 release, the Austin, TX-based trio had gone from a small label to a major then back to an indie again only to release what remains their most excellent and concerted effort, pound for pound.

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