11 Songs, 49 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Jocie Adams is a classically trained composer and multi-instrumentalist who did time with the Americana indie band Low Anthem before packing up her love of classical, cabaret, ‘70s folk, and even big-band music and trekking off in search of a decidedly different project. She took up with a new crew of friends to play with an expanded assortment of musical toys, including cello, trumpets, banjo, trombone, and plenty of keyboards and percussion. Arc Iris is the stunningly wide-ranged debut with Adams directing the parade: it’s a festival of marching horns, bluesy piano, sighing pedal steel, and playful cello parts that sometimes bellow like a didgeridoo. Adams’ voice is like a more subdued, Malibu-inflected Björk, and her way with stylistic shifts and melody is informed, confident, and restrained. The muted booming percussion, twinkling acoustic guitar, and banjo over a warm backwash of cello and trumpet on “Whiskey Man” is enchanting, and the frisky banjos and piano on “Money Gnomes” has a sweet, carnivalesque feel. Arc Iris touches a crazy number of musical markers, but overall it can be tagged as a smart, extremely musical, and adventurous outing that’s full of surprises.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Jocie Adams is a classically trained composer and multi-instrumentalist who did time with the Americana indie band Low Anthem before packing up her love of classical, cabaret, ‘70s folk, and even big-band music and trekking off in search of a decidedly different project. She took up with a new crew of friends to play with an expanded assortment of musical toys, including cello, trumpets, banjo, trombone, and plenty of keyboards and percussion. Arc Iris is the stunningly wide-ranged debut with Adams directing the parade: it’s a festival of marching horns, bluesy piano, sighing pedal steel, and playful cello parts that sometimes bellow like a didgeridoo. Adams’ voice is like a more subdued, Malibu-inflected Björk, and her way with stylistic shifts and melody is informed, confident, and restrained. The muted booming percussion, twinkling acoustic guitar, and banjo over a warm backwash of cello and trumpet on “Whiskey Man” is enchanting, and the frisky banjos and piano on “Money Gnomes” has a sweet, carnivalesque feel. Arc Iris touches a crazy number of musical markers, but overall it can be tagged as a smart, extremely musical, and adventurous outing that’s full of surprises.

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About Arc Iris

Arc Iris are a wildly adventurous, genre-blurring band founded in Massachusetts by frontwoman, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist Jocie Adams, formerly of the Low Anthem. Her bandmembers include the seasoned rhythm section of bassist Max Johnson, pianist and multi-instrumentalist Zachary Tenorio-Miller, and drummer Raymond Belli, with cellist Robin Ryczek and trumpeter Mike Irwin. Adams, a formally trained classical composer (as well as a former NASA researcher), formed the band as a wide-ranging ensemble informed by everything from sophisticated 1970s pop to folk, country, cabaret, jazz, classical music, and contemporary sources such as Grizzly Bear.

The band established itself as a touring ensemble with Calexico, CocoRosie, Marco Benevento, Menomena, and Justin Townes Earle, to name a few, and was signed to Anti in 2013. The group's self-titled debut album, recorded and mixed by Dan Cardinal (with Andrew Barr on drums) and featuring a large cast of musical collaborators, was released in April 2014, drawing considerable critical acclaim. Building on their unique sound, Arc Iris delivered their follow-up, the more textural and rhythmic Moon Saloon, in August 2016. The album was self-produced and mixed by David Wrench (FKA twigs, Jamie xx). ~ Thom Jurek

ORIGIN
Providence, RI
FORMED
2012

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