13 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Her assertive yet tender vocals and folk-influenced songwriting make Crystal Bowersox's major-label debut Farmer’s Daughter stand out from the pack as well. More than most American Idol alumni, Bowersox radiates authenticity — there’s real angst and desire in her tales of growing up in rural Ohio. From the angry title track to the reflective “Holy Toledo” and the urgent “On the Run,” she conveys the spirit of a yearning soul with believable passion. Bowersox is able to celebrate the joys of classic pop-culture in “Ridin’ With the Radio” as well as deliver heartfelt romantic balladry in “Mason,” a duet with husband Brian Walker. There’s a late-‘60s hippie vibe to many of these tracks, with “Speak Now” conjuring up flashes of the Band and a cover of the Buffalo Springfield’s “For What It’s Worth” rekindling the fires of the protest era. With “Arlene,” Crystal offers a character study of a tough, resolute woman that could serve as her own personal anthem. Bowersox definitely scores impressively with this release.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Her assertive yet tender vocals and folk-influenced songwriting make Crystal Bowersox's major-label debut Farmer’s Daughter stand out from the pack as well. More than most American Idol alumni, Bowersox radiates authenticity — there’s real angst and desire in her tales of growing up in rural Ohio. From the angry title track to the reflective “Holy Toledo” and the urgent “On the Run,” she conveys the spirit of a yearning soul with believable passion. Bowersox is able to celebrate the joys of classic pop-culture in “Ridin’ With the Radio” as well as deliver heartfelt romantic balladry in “Mason,” a duet with husband Brian Walker. There’s a late-‘60s hippie vibe to many of these tracks, with “Speak Now” conjuring up flashes of the Band and a cover of the Buffalo Springfield’s “For What It’s Worth” rekindling the fires of the protest era. With “Arlene,” Crystal offers a character study of a tough, resolute woman that could serve as her own personal anthem. Bowersox definitely scores impressively with this release.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
1.1K Ratings
1.1K Ratings
janeospain ,

Just my Opinion

I love the voice and have been waiting for this album. Crystal can sing anything no doubt about it, I only wish the song choices would have ben a little less country
and more to her root music. Memphis is full of female entertainers, and I just do not want her to get lost in that genre. Crystal is a stand out performer and can cross many styles with her unique voice, come on recording company, you do not have to play it safe with this artist. I will buy this album to support Crystal with hopes that the next time around we will see a break out album that expresses her soulful rock side.

QueenLizzyKing ,

The Best Post-Idol Album Yet!

I have been waiting for this album since the first time I heard Crystal Bowersox sing on idol! She is by far the most talented, passionate, heartfelt musician that I have seen make their way through network television. I have been listening to this album on AOL's preview for the last week leading up to the release, and every song is amazing. Crystal's charm, heartbreak, and talent distinguish her own songs from the others right away, but as a whole each song fits into the others perfectly. I can't recommend this album enough, it is truly amazing, inspiring, beautiful, and exciting! Crystal Bowersox has a Janis Joplin, Joss Stone, Ani DiFranco, and Melissa Etheridge blend that can't be replicated by anyone.

SuzyShrink ,

worth the wait

This CD is phenomenal - Crystal Bowersox is one of those talents that only comes around once in a generation.

About Crystal Bowersox

Taking cues from her favorite songwriters -- including Melissa Etheridge, Janis Joplin, and Sista Otis -- Crystal Bowersox brought a relaxed, folksy vibe to the ninth season of American Idol. Although she auditioned for the show in Chicago, Bowersox grew up five hours east in Elliston, Ohio, a small town with fewer than 100 residents. She began writing songs as a ten-year-old and, by her early teens, had formed a band with her brothers. Dubbed "Oldinuph" -- a name that poked fun at their own adolescence -- the siblings played shows throughout Ottawa County for several years, with Bowersox writing most of their original material. She eventually moved to Chicago at the age of 17, looking to pursue her career in a bigger city.

Bowersox spent five years in Chicago before moving back home to give birth to her son, Tony. She continued performing in local venues, though, and auditioned for American Idol during a weekend trip to Chicago in 2009. Although her blonde dreadlocks and earthy vocals made her a rarity among most Idol contenders, Bowersox quickly became an audience favorite, breezing through each round of the competition with performances of "You Can't Always Get What You Want," "Me and Bobby McGee," and other rootsy songs. Following Siobhan Magnus' elimination in early May, Bowersox was the only female contestant left, and she eventually finished as the runner-up to American Idol champion Lee DeWyze. Her debut album, Farmer's Daughter, appeared later that year.

Farmer's Daughter received a standard post-Idol media push, but the album failed to turn into a hit. The following year, RCA Records went under a restructuring that left Bowersox without a label. In 2012, she signed with Shanachie Records, and the label teamed her with producer Steve Berlin (best known as a member of Los Lobos). The resulting record, All That for This, showed up in March of 2013. The next year, she issued the Promises EP. Her third album, Alive, arrived in the summer of 2017. ~ Andrew Leahey

HOMETOWN
Toledo, OH
GENRE
Pop
BORN
August 4, 1985

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