11 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though not quite as raw as the bedroom (woodshed?) recording How To Survive In The Woods (released later the same year), Brooklyn’s Woods delivered its Shrimper Records debut wrapped in the wooly, murky layers that would become a trademark. Jeremy Earl and Christian DeRoeck (Earl’s bandmates change with each release) use ‘60s folk-rock touchstones as inspiration for their rough and organic sound, one richly conflated with an urbane, artistic sensibility. “Love Song for Pigeons” sounds like a late-night loft party, but the wood blocks and sour strumming are rooted in Appalachia; “Walk the Dogs” has a bit of the hillbilly nightmare in it, but evokes the sophistication of Tom Waits. Torn between folk and rock, Woods’ dual identity is exemplified by tracks like the ramshackle “Be Still,” hinting at their Dinosaur, Jr. affinity that later colors much of their work, and on the lysergically evocative “Picking Up the Pieces.” The first three tracks are wonderfully woozy and memorable takes on the duo’s interpretation of “pop” music.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though not quite as raw as the bedroom (woodshed?) recording How To Survive In The Woods (released later the same year), Brooklyn’s Woods delivered its Shrimper Records debut wrapped in the wooly, murky layers that would become a trademark. Jeremy Earl and Christian DeRoeck (Earl’s bandmates change with each release) use ‘60s folk-rock touchstones as inspiration for their rough and organic sound, one richly conflated with an urbane, artistic sensibility. “Love Song for Pigeons” sounds like a late-night loft party, but the wood blocks and sour strumming are rooted in Appalachia; “Walk the Dogs” has a bit of the hillbilly nightmare in it, but evokes the sophistication of Tom Waits. Torn between folk and rock, Woods’ dual identity is exemplified by tracks like the ramshackle “Be Still,” hinting at their Dinosaur, Jr. affinity that later colors much of their work, and on the lysergically evocative “Picking Up the Pieces.” The first three tracks are wonderfully woozy and memorable takes on the duo’s interpretation of “pop” music.

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