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Customer Reviews

New Order is good, but….

How many compilations can a band put out before it gets old to do so? New Order alone has over five now! And it's tiring!

What makes this one stick out is that it connects Joy Division to New Order, which is nice. Also, it's length is not that bad, though I find the Shep Pettibone mix of "Love Triangle" inferior to the original. I might like it a bit longer, but it is mostly fine. Apart from the good songs themselves, this compliation had little going for it. The four stars are mainly for the songs themselves and adding JD.

The logical next step would be to add an Electronic song or two.

Edit: I have tried the 12" version of the Shep Pettibone mix, which is awesome.

Hellbent for New Order

Hellbent is a great song by New Order, they keep on making great music even after thirty years, New Order is an amazing band that made some of the best music around. It is very sad that they broke up, I hope that they put aside their differences and make great music again.

Total

This is a nice collection of Joy Division songs, and an odd collection of New Order Songs. Why Crystal and Krafty are on here, I have no idea. Hellbent, however, is a great song.

Biography

Formed: 1977 in Manchester, England

Genre: Alternative

Years Active: '70s, '80s

Formed in the wake of the punk explosion in England, Joy Division became the first band in the post-punk movement by later emphasizing not anger and energy but mood and expression, pointing ahead to the rise of melancholy alternative music in the '80s. Though the group's raw initial sides fit the bill for any punk band, Joy Division later incorporated synthesizers (taboo in the low-tech world of '70s punk) and more haunting melodies, emphasized by the isolated, tortured lyrics of its lead vocalist,...
Full Bio