13 Songs, 58 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

On her debut, Dark Energy, Chicago producer Jlin took footwork music past the known limits of the form, braiding sleek, rolling drums into hypnotic triplet patterns; on the follow-up, Black Origami, she emphasized the globe-spanning percussive palette that makes her work unique. Autobiography, her score to a major piece by the British choreographer Wayne McGregor, represents a detour in her evolution. Stutter-stepping cuts like “Unorthodox Elements” alternate with synth-strafed trap mutations (“Annotation”) and even pensive ambient interludes like “Anamnesis, Pt. 1,” a minimalist study for piano and empty space. Jlin’s relentless kinetic energy shines like never before on tunes like “The Abyss of Doubt,” which sounds like a mainframe computer being torn apart by heavy machinery; it’s no wonder dancers would want to flex to this.

EDITORS’ NOTES

On her debut, Dark Energy, Chicago producer Jlin took footwork music past the known limits of the form, braiding sleek, rolling drums into hypnotic triplet patterns; on the follow-up, Black Origami, she emphasized the globe-spanning percussive palette that makes her work unique. Autobiography, her score to a major piece by the British choreographer Wayne McGregor, represents a detour in her evolution. Stutter-stepping cuts like “Unorthodox Elements” alternate with synth-strafed trap mutations (“Annotation”) and even pensive ambient interludes like “Anamnesis, Pt. 1,” a minimalist study for piano and empty space. Jlin’s relentless kinetic energy shines like never before on tunes like “The Abyss of Doubt,” which sounds like a mainframe computer being torn apart by heavy machinery; it’s no wonder dancers would want to flex to this.

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