11 Songs, 28 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The MC5’s second studio album didn’t bulge at the seams with the raw proto-punk power of its 1969 debut, Kick Out the Jams. But there’s a deeper magic working its way throughout 1970’s Back in the USA. Here, the band soaked up the soul, doo-wop, and R&B coming out of its Detroit home and blasted it out from towering amplifiers. It opens with a supercharged cover of “Tutti-Frutti,” giving the tune more muscle than even Little Richard could. The band's own “Tonight” melds '50s jukebox-inspired riffs with lyrics of teen angst. Speaking of teen tension, you’d be hard-pressed to find a rock ‘n’ roll song that better channels the burning urgency of adolescent libidos than “Teenage Lust.” It conveys the palpable yearning for carnal indulgence even better than The Rolling Stones’ “(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction”—so much, that the only way to follow up the song’s climactic ending was with the smoldering soul ballad “Let Me Try,” where Rob Tyner’s voice serves as a reminder that he was raised on the emotional music coming out of Motown. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

The MC5’s second studio album didn’t bulge at the seams with the raw proto-punk power of its 1969 debut, Kick Out the Jams. But there’s a deeper magic working its way throughout 1970’s Back in the USA. Here, the band soaked up the soul, doo-wop, and R&B coming out of its Detroit home and blasted it out from towering amplifiers. It opens with a supercharged cover of “Tutti-Frutti,” giving the tune more muscle than even Little Richard could. The band's own “Tonight” melds '50s jukebox-inspired riffs with lyrics of teen angst. Speaking of teen tension, you’d be hard-pressed to find a rock ‘n’ roll song that better channels the burning urgency of adolescent libidos than “Teenage Lust.” It conveys the palpable yearning for carnal indulgence even better than The Rolling Stones’ “(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction”—so much, that the only way to follow up the song’s climactic ending was with the smoldering soul ballad “Let Me Try,” where Rob Tyner’s voice serves as a reminder that he was raised on the emotional music coming out of Motown. 

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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
30 Ratings
30 Ratings
Speediejohn ,

MC5 Back IN The USA/

One of the Best Rock N Roll Records of all time. I've been listening to it for over 25 years and it still knocks me out! The greatest guitar solos ever put to vinyl. One of the bands that influenced the origins of the Punk Rock movement. This band kicks serious A*#!!!

hurricane smith ,

Most accessible MC5 album

If you're not a devout fan already this is probably the album to get. I do think Kick Out The Jams is better overall but if you want to get a taste of what the MC5 were all about this is the album to get. It's their most straight ahead rock & roll album and as such definitely anticipated Pub Rock and Punk.

HSfonz ,

don't fall for it.

The funny thing about people that claim to be MC5 fans is that you rarely see them actually LISTENING to the records.They're like Dead fans that way. People feel like they need to listen to this silly crap because old fogey critics pining away for they're youth in the 60's say it's "The Real Thing." Rubbish.This record exposes the fact that that the 5 were nothing but a bunch of psuedo-intellectual blowhards,buying drugs w/ Electra's $$$ and taking advantage of the times.What a crock.Anyone w/ the sense of a 4 year old can see that this is sold to a certain market.Instead of listening to a bunch of old irrelevant men,listen to something w/ substance,something REALLY punk.Miles Davis,Frank Zappa,Jimi Hendrix,not the Stooges or MC5.It's phony.Even Led Zeppelin is more socially relevant than this.The "critics" know this and let it seep in with the rest of their self loathing.ANd if you don't want to listen to Hendrix or Miles,don't listen to ME either. FInd something new and leave these fakes where they belong. 3/4s dead from too many binges.

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