26 Songs, 1 Hour 14 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

New York City’s The Left Banke had their share of inner strife, but in the late ’60s the band made an incredible body of baroque-pop (led mostly by Steve Martin-Caro’s honeyed voice) that sidled up nicely to The Bee Gees and The Zombies. This set collects the teen band’s two albums and non-LP singles. There’s mad garage riffing (“I Haven’t Got the Nerve”), guitar fuzz-bombing (“Lazy Day”), and a country-esque sing-along (“What Do You Know”). There’s also sweet syrupy jangle (“She May Call You Up Tonight”), shimmering melancholy (“Dark Is the Bark”), and a brass-enhanced Burt Bacharach doppelganger (“In the Morning Light”). You can’t escape the hypnotic beauty of the hits “Pretty Ballerina” and “Walk Away Renee,” with their mournful strings and intricate three-part harmonies, nor the stunner “Desiree,” whose intricately arranged harmonies and horns resemble The Association at their best.

EDITORS’ NOTES

New York City’s The Left Banke had their share of inner strife, but in the late ’60s the band made an incredible body of baroque-pop (led mostly by Steve Martin-Caro’s honeyed voice) that sidled up nicely to The Bee Gees and The Zombies. This set collects the teen band’s two albums and non-LP singles. There’s mad garage riffing (“I Haven’t Got the Nerve”), guitar fuzz-bombing (“Lazy Day”), and a country-esque sing-along (“What Do You Know”). There’s also sweet syrupy jangle (“She May Call You Up Tonight”), shimmering melancholy (“Dark Is the Bark”), and a brass-enhanced Burt Bacharach doppelganger (“In the Morning Light”). You can’t escape the hypnotic beauty of the hits “Pretty Ballerina” and “Walk Away Renee,” with their mournful strings and intricate three-part harmonies, nor the stunner “Desiree,” whose intricately arranged harmonies and horns resemble The Association at their best.

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