11 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The late Long John Baldry was a pioneer of the '60s British blues movement. In the States, he became better known as a musical mentor for Rod Stewart and Elton John than for his own diverse catalog as an artist. The Best of the Stony Plain Years provides a balanced overview of his latter-day recordings released prior to his passing in 2005. Baldry’s gravelly vocal style gave his work a streetwise authenticity, whether he was rendering contemporary tunes or traditional material. On this collection, he displays both his rough-hewn and polished sides with the easy touch of a musical master. His skill at interpreting folk tunes can be heard on “Midnight Special” and “Gallows Pole” (both from his LP Remembering Leadbelly), as well as on “Black Girl,” a stunning duet with Kathi McDonald. “Easy Street” and “Midnight in New Orleans” reveal his rascally charm as a jazz singer, while blues tunes like “I’m Shakin’” and “Dimples” find him full of swagger and sass. A special treat is “Time’s Gettin' Tougher Than Tough,” featuring Jimmy Witherspoon and The Duke Robillard Band. Baldry’s legacy is well served by this excellent compilation.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The late Long John Baldry was a pioneer of the '60s British blues movement. In the States, he became better known as a musical mentor for Rod Stewart and Elton John than for his own diverse catalog as an artist. The Best of the Stony Plain Years provides a balanced overview of his latter-day recordings released prior to his passing in 2005. Baldry’s gravelly vocal style gave his work a streetwise authenticity, whether he was rendering contemporary tunes or traditional material. On this collection, he displays both his rough-hewn and polished sides with the easy touch of a musical master. His skill at interpreting folk tunes can be heard on “Midnight Special” and “Gallows Pole” (both from his LP Remembering Leadbelly), as well as on “Black Girl,” a stunning duet with Kathi McDonald. “Easy Street” and “Midnight in New Orleans” reveal his rascally charm as a jazz singer, while blues tunes like “I’m Shakin’” and “Dimples” find him full of swagger and sass. A special treat is “Time’s Gettin' Tougher Than Tough,” featuring Jimmy Witherspoon and The Duke Robillard Band. Baldry’s legacy is well served by this excellent compilation.

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About Long John Baldry

Like Cliff Richard, Chris Farlowe, Slade, Blur, and eel pie, Long John Baldry is one of those peculiarly British phenomena that doggedly resists American translation. As a historical figure, he has undeniable importance. When he began singing as a teenager in the 1950s, he was one of the first British vocalists to perform folk and blues music. In the early '60s, he sang in the band of British blues godfather Alexis Korner, Blues Incorporated, which also served as a starting point for future rock stars Mick Jagger, Jack Bruce, and others. As a member of Blues Incorporated, he contributed to the first British blues album, R&B at the Marquee (1962). He then joined the Cyril Davies R&B All Stars, taking over the group (renamed Long John Baldry and His Hoochie Coochie Men) after Davies' death in early 1964. This band featured Rod Stewart as a second vocalist, and also employed Geoff Bradford (who had been in an embryonic version of the Rolling Stones) on guitar.

In the mid-'60s, he helped form Steampacket, a proto-supergroup that also featured Stewart, Julie Driscoll, and Brian Auger. When Steampacket broke up, he fronted Bluesology, the band that gave keyboardist Reg Dwight -- soon to become Elton John -- his first prestigious gig. He was a well-liked figure on the London club circuit, and in fact the Beatles took him on as a guest on one of their 1964 British TV specials, at a time when the Fab Four could have been no bigger, and Baldry was virtually unknown.

Ironically, his greatest commercial success came not with blues, but orchestrated pop ballads that echoed Engelbert Humperdinck. The 1967 single "Let the Heartaches Begin" reached number one in Britain, and Baldry had several other small British hits in the late '60s, the biggest of which was "Mexico" (1968). (None of these made an impression in the U.S.) The commercial success of his ballads led Baldry to forsake the blues on record for a few years. He returned to blues and rock in 1971 on It Ain't Easy, for which Rod Stewart and Elton John shared the production duties. The album contained a tiny American chart item, "Don't Try to Lay No Boogie-Woogie on the King of Rock'n'Roll," and Stewart and John split the production once again on the 1972 follow-up, Everything Stops for Tea. Baldry never caught on as an international figure, though, and by 1980 had become a Canadian citizen. He continued to record, and did commercial voice-overs as well as the voice of Doctor Robotnik in children's cartoons. After battling a severe chest infection for several months, Long John Baldry passed away on July 21, 2005, while hospitalized in Vancouver. ~ Richie Unterberger

  • ORIGIN
    England
  • GENRE
    Blues
  • BORN
    January 12, 1941

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