12 Songs, 39 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Personal tragedies and years of relentless touring took their toll on Arish Ahmad Khan and his psychedelic R&B ensemble. Khan entered therapy, was forced to start from square one, and spent time as part of a duo. But with Idle No More, the manic horn sections, the raw garage sounds, the psychedelic freakouts, and the anything-goes party vibe course through “Luckiest Man,” where it feels as if the last five years never elapsed. “Better Luck Next Time” jangles guitars in the verses and blares horns in the chorus, and it slows to a near-break before cruising through the final minute. There’s a political undertone, and the album title is a nod to an indigenous Canadian movement—but mostly the fighting spirit is used to motivate these folks to kick out the jams while they can. Khan even hits a gorgeous and wobbly falsetto for the ballad “Darkness”; it's further proof that energy and authenticity mean more than manicured performances where every note is pitch-perfect.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Personal tragedies and years of relentless touring took their toll on Arish Ahmad Khan and his psychedelic R&B ensemble. Khan entered therapy, was forced to start from square one, and spent time as part of a duo. But with Idle No More, the manic horn sections, the raw garage sounds, the psychedelic freakouts, and the anything-goes party vibe course through “Luckiest Man,” where it feels as if the last five years never elapsed. “Better Luck Next Time” jangles guitars in the verses and blares horns in the chorus, and it slows to a near-break before cruising through the final minute. There’s a political undertone, and the album title is a nod to an indigenous Canadian movement—but mostly the fighting spirit is used to motivate these folks to kick out the jams while they can. Khan even hits a gorgeous and wobbly falsetto for the ballad “Darkness”; it's further proof that energy and authenticity mean more than manicured performances where every note is pitch-perfect.

TITLE TIME
3:11
3:01
3:00
3:43
3:02
4:04
3:45
3:12
3:50
2:23
2:56
3:38

About King Khan & The Shrines

A Canadian of Indian descent who resides much of the time in Berlin, King Khan emerged as one of the most colorful and exciting performers in the indie underground of the early 2000s. Khan and his backing band the Shrines deliver classic soul and funk with hints of garage punk attitude and free jazz abandon. His spectacular live show is like a soul revue at CBGB, and his albums translate the energy of those shows perfectly, while also allowing for a nice dose of studiocraft and polish. Khan is also one half of the doo wop/garage punk duo the King Khan & BBQ Show and also released a single with his young daughter Saba Lou.

  • ORIGIN
    Montreal, Canada
  • BORN
    January 24, 1977

Songs

Albums

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