14 Songs, 1 Hour 7 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

At a time when many musicians are being forced to downscale their aspirations, Björk dares to dream. The Icelandic chanteuse has been relentlessly experimental, challenging listeners with music that defies expectations of what popular songs can be. Yet make no mistake; Björk may use avant-garde forms to express herself, but at heart she’s an artist who wants to include everyone and would love to hear the world humming her tunes, no matter how battered and mysterious they may be. The slow, meticulous chords and friction-filled rhythms of “Mutual Core” are perfectly complementary. The angelic whispers, the demanding rasp, the lonely notes that tick like Father Time throughout “Solstice” channel a unique art-song process. “Thunderbolt” creeps up, rhythmless and then with a plod, as voices fall in and out of a choir and a synthesizer limps along. “Crystaline” picks up the tempo, just barely, as Björk explores the natural world. “Dark Matter” sounds like the score for a horror film, as a funeral organ chases voices of spirits. This album is one of a kind.

EDITORS’ NOTES

At a time when many musicians are being forced to downscale their aspirations, Björk dares to dream. The Icelandic chanteuse has been relentlessly experimental, challenging listeners with music that defies expectations of what popular songs can be. Yet make no mistake; Björk may use avant-garde forms to express herself, but at heart she’s an artist who wants to include everyone and would love to hear the world humming her tunes, no matter how battered and mysterious they may be. The slow, meticulous chords and friction-filled rhythms of “Mutual Core” are perfectly complementary. The angelic whispers, the demanding rasp, the lonely notes that tick like Father Time throughout “Solstice” channel a unique art-song process. “Thunderbolt” creeps up, rhythmless and then with a plod, as voices fall in and out of a choir and a synthesizer limps along. “Crystaline” picks up the tempo, just barely, as Björk explores the natural world. “Dark Matter” sounds like the score for a horror film, as a funeral organ chases voices of spirits. This album is one of a kind.

TITLE TIME
14

Ratings and Reviews

4.1 out of 5
556 Ratings
556 Ratings
Imma people ,

SDKHRSPIHGS

Yay

ddonddana ,

Biophilia

Yes, yes, we understand that we have multiple discrepancies about this album, but is it really worth to say it's the worst thing she has ever created?
Bjork's seventh offering (disregarding her album from 1977 when she was young) Biophilia, it is much more than just hearing that a "protein transmutates" and learning about biology and geography. Biophilia demonstrates how Bjork, who represents a disconnected Mother Earth, has created the world she knows, explaining how she wishes to reconnect with her missing half, who we hear about in her song "Mutual Core", and even trying to rejoin this entity by patiently waiting, much like a "Virus".
This biophilic project is an excellent example of how Bjork is maleable to changes in her sound, but is also one of the outstanding ways she contributes to music in our generation. The variety of instrumentals surrounding her voice, especially in songs such as "Cosmogony" and "Crystalline".
This didactic album is something to be reckon, and indeed is a "Groundbreaking Project". I would highly recommend listening to this album after listening to her previous albums, such as Post and Homogenic.

Yaas💕 ,

😓

Trash

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