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Path of Totality

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Album Review

From the swells of arcing sound that kick off "Black Hole Summer" — the kind of song title that puts together familiar tropes in a just distinct enough way, much like the band's work itself — Tombs initially seem to demonstrate their approach as working in pre-established ways on Path of Totality. Given guitarist/vocalist Mike Hill's previous work as well as earlier releases under the Tombs name, it's almost tempting to say this is the album that best encapsulates all his approaches in one place. But better instead to see it as a continuing refinement of a collection of impulses that shows the depth of 21th century metal, one that acknowledges bleak, slow-building masterpieces from the past without aiming to re-create them. No song is longer than seven minutes, but the sheer weight of build on pieces like "To Cross the Land," starting with a stark guitar line that relentless transmutes into a crushing full arrangement, is breathtaking, an effect recurring on songs like "Silent World." The deep-voiced chanting on "Passageways" and elsewhere contrasts the rougher work from Hill through most of the album, shading the compositions with an even doomier feeling. At its best, an individual song on the album feels like it could soundtrack a version of Game of Thrones that is nothing but bleakness without recompense, all shadows, betrayal, and undiluted power. It's perhaps appropriate that the song "Bloodletters" fulfills this brief perfectly, but "Black Heaven," with its cannon-shot drumming and sheer exultant, tense power, may be the winner on a strong album through and through.

Customer Reviews

Very black.

Less Helmet sounding than their last one, more black metal murkiness with Joy Division/New Order swimming around in there at times. Still hear some Page Hamilton sounding vocals which is always a good thing. Tombs keeps proggressing and expanding/morphing their sound. Love this one and can't wait to see what they do next.

I don't think

That they'll ever be able to capture on a recording how epic they sound live.

Saw them with ISIS. in Mass.

turned me on to them for sure. dig this album a lot.
It is a shame that Korn decided to use the same exact album name , but used "The" Path Of Totality.


Formed: 2007 in Brooklyn, New York, NY

Genre: Rock

Years Active: '00s, '10s

Formed in 2007 as a collaboration between Mike Hill (Anodyne), Dominic Seita (Speedloader), and Justin Ennis (the Heuristic), Brooklyn, New York-based, experimental metal outfit Tombs blends bleak, post-rock minimalism with the ferocious attack of sludge and classic black metal. The group's dark proto-industrial sounds were first put to wax that year in the form of a two-song EP simply entitled Tombs, and by the time the group got around to unleashing a proper full-length for Relapse, 2009’s Winter...
Full Bio
Path of Totality, Tombs
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Customer Ratings