11 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

 “It’s an allegory of the physics of my life,” Jim White says, explaining the album's title which came to him while passing a construction site one day. “The construction site is my mind, and the substrate I’ve been drilling holes in is the tangled maze of impressions that Jesus, poverty, and the loneliness of being raised an outsider in the South have conspired to lay beneath my feet.” And with that rather poetic introduction to this collection of richly literary songs (Faulkner, McCarthy and O’Connor have always haunted his works with their American-gothic overtones), you have some insight to the slightly spooky nature of White’s musings. He pens a moving love song to his young daughter in “Bluebird”, but the salvation found there is also serving to help him bury a past he’d rather forget. “Combing My Hair in a Brand New Style” is a clever account of shedding one’s skin and starting over, and the heartfelt “Land Called Home” might be sung by someone who feels he has, indeed, found a home – or at least a place in the world. It’s been a long time coming for White (this is album #3), but the musical world now seems to agree that someone important has arrived on the scene. The Barenaked Ladies, M. Ward, Bill Frisell, Ralph Carney, and Aimee Mann (who helped make “Static on the Radio” a minor hit) grace the credits, and help color in the spaces drawn by White’s sure hand. Joe Henry adds a late-night jazzy feel to a handful of tracks as producer.

EDITORS’ NOTES

 “It’s an allegory of the physics of my life,” Jim White says, explaining the album's title which came to him while passing a construction site one day. “The construction site is my mind, and the substrate I’ve been drilling holes in is the tangled maze of impressions that Jesus, poverty, and the loneliness of being raised an outsider in the South have conspired to lay beneath my feet.” And with that rather poetic introduction to this collection of richly literary songs (Faulkner, McCarthy and O’Connor have always haunted his works with their American-gothic overtones), you have some insight to the slightly spooky nature of White’s musings. He pens a moving love song to his young daughter in “Bluebird”, but the salvation found there is also serving to help him bury a past he’d rather forget. “Combing My Hair in a Brand New Style” is a clever account of shedding one’s skin and starting over, and the heartfelt “Land Called Home” might be sung by someone who feels he has, indeed, found a home – or at least a place in the world. It’s been a long time coming for White (this is album #3), but the musical world now seems to agree that someone important has arrived on the scene. The Barenaked Ladies, M. Ward, Bill Frisell, Ralph Carney, and Aimee Mann (who helped make “Static on the Radio” a minor hit) grace the credits, and help color in the spaces drawn by White’s sure hand. Joe Henry adds a late-night jazzy feel to a handful of tracks as producer.

TITLE TIME
6:31
5:29
6:24
6:22
4:34
4:36
5:58
7:00
4:25
7:09
4:11

About Jim White

Southern Gothic singer/songwriter Jim White grew up in Pensacola, Florida, enamored with the sounds of the white gospel music he heard on the Gospel Jubilee television series. After spending his formative years on the outskirts of a deeply Pentecostal community, he entertained a career as a professional surfer, followed by a stint in Milan as a fashion model. A bandsaw accident that resulted in a maimed left hand seemed to end White's hopes as a musician, but after writing a collection of simple songs on his guitar, a friend convinced him to record a demo, which ultimately made its way to the offices of David Byrne's Luaka Bop label. After re-recording the songs, White issued his debut, Wrong-Eyed Jesus!, a collection of atmospheric, oddly spiritual country-folk performances, in 1997. No Such Place was issued in early 2001. In 2004, White released Drill a Hole in That Substrate and Tell Me What You See (again on Luaka Bop), which featured such eccentric guests as the Barenaked Ladies, Aimee Mann, and Bill Frisell. The year 2005 saw the release of Music from Searching for the Wrong-Eyed Jesus, a soundtrack to the surrealist road film by director Andrew Douglas that featured material by White, the Handsome Family, 16 Horsepower, and others. Transnormal Skiperoo arrived in 2007, followed by the live EP Funny Little Cross to Bear in early 2009. Sounds of the Americans appeared in 2011. Parting ways with Luaka Bop, White continued his fascinating and eclectic journey through the mists of Americana with Where It Hits You early in 2012, his first release for new label Yep Roc Records. In 2014, White was approached by the Athens, Georgia roots music ensemble the Packway Handle Band to produce an album for the group, and the project grew into a collaborative project between White and the Packways, 2015's Take It Like a Man. ~ Jason Ankeny

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