11 Songs, 37 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bob is a cryptic concept album that gains more lyrical momentum from New York singer/songwriter Ward White’s novelistic eye and knack for capturing a moment than it does from linear motion. The eponymous character at its center is surrounded by a series of parallel and overlapping narratives, adding up to a tale that's almost Thomas Pynchon–esque in its storytelling sleight of hand. The musical framework that White fashioned to support his story is just as assiduously crafted. Between the singer’s penthouse-elevator vocal range (with plush, cloud-hopping melodies to match), Joe McGinty’s vintage-keyboard coloring, and White’s own eloquent lead guitar lines, Bob should lighten the heart of anyone who feared that classic art-pop à la David Bowie, Scott Walker, Sparks, et al., was an endangered species. Whoever Bob is, he’s far from an everyman, seemingly having more in common with the kind of characters frequenting Donald Fagen or Elvis Costello songs than those of, say, Bruce Springsteen. But White’s work here is all about achieving something indelibly uncommon.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Bob is a cryptic concept album that gains more lyrical momentum from New York singer/songwriter Ward White’s novelistic eye and knack for capturing a moment than it does from linear motion. The eponymous character at its center is surrounded by a series of parallel and overlapping narratives, adding up to a tale that's almost Thomas Pynchon–esque in its storytelling sleight of hand. The musical framework that White fashioned to support his story is just as assiduously crafted. Between the singer’s penthouse-elevator vocal range (with plush, cloud-hopping melodies to match), Joe McGinty’s vintage-keyboard coloring, and White’s own eloquent lead guitar lines, Bob should lighten the heart of anyone who feared that classic art-pop à la David Bowie, Scott Walker, Sparks, et al., was an endangered species. Whoever Bob is, he’s far from an everyman, seemingly having more in common with the kind of characters frequenting Donald Fagen or Elvis Costello songs than those of, say, Bruce Springsteen. But White’s work here is all about achieving something indelibly uncommon.

TITLE TIME
4:25
3:10
3:25
2:56
3:05
1:26
3:01
4:20
2:04
3:37
6:17

About Ward White

Ward White has the writing style of Hank Williams with the pop sense of The Beatles and the laid back presentation of Bob Dylan. In 1998 Ward White put out his debut release, Artificial Light with a stellar cast of New York music veterans. One of the musicians he teamed up with was Phoebe Summersquash a drummer who has played with Small Factory, The Godrays and Brilliantine. On bass and guitar was Alex Kemp who was also a member of Small Factory and The Godrays. On the album you will also find Jason Frangos the cellist who was a past member of Cornelius and 888. The recording was overseen by producers Aaron Keene who has worked with A.D. and The Veronica Lodge, Greg Griffith who has worked with vitapup and Benna, and Ray Martin known for his work with Marcy Playground, VPN, and Into Another. Ward White could be found performing in the New York City area, in 1999, with drummer Noah Simon and bassist Aaron Keane. 1999 also found Ward White back in the studio working on his follow-up release, Medicine. This one warns, Ward White, "sounds like Graham Parsons meets Radiohead". ~ Larry Belanger

  • ORIGIN
    Connecticut
  • GENRE
    Rock

Songs

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