13 Songs, 1 Hour 18 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

In the three years since Kurt Vile released his last solo record, 2015’s B'lieve I’m Goin’ Down..., he’s enjoyed a bona fide radio hit (“Pretty Pimpin”), released a collaborative LP with Courtney Barnett (2017’s Lotta Sea Lice), and opened shows for a pair of his heroes (John Prine, Willie Nelson.) Through it all, the Philly singer-songwriter found the time to write and record Bottle It In, with collaborators both familiar (Mary Lattimore, Kim Gordon, Stella Mozgawa) and new (producer Shawn Everett, Cass McCombs). The result is one of his best and most introspective albums to date. Vile tells Apple Music about how it all took shape.

*What would you say you’ve learned this time around?*
I’m always learning things, always getting a little older and a little wiser. One of my favorite new philosophies: I realized a long time ago that I don’t force touring or songwriting. If I don’t feel it, I don’t do it. Times are insane. In a rare moment that they aren’t insane, take it really slow. Don’t move. Sit around. There’s gonna be a deadline eventually.

***This feels like one of your weirder records. The title track is a pop song but not. ***
That song came from the heart. It’s about being rejected. It’s got pop sensibility, it’s melodic—all those things. I thought I’d shave it down, but everybody that was involved, they took passes and it turned into this other thing. It was a moment of realness. It wasn’t jazz, but something orchestral, something beautiful.

***Is there a song on here that you feel particularly strongly about?***
In the three years since Kurt Vile released his last solo record, 2015’s B'lieve I’m Goin’ Down..., he’s enjoyed a bona fide radio hit (“Pretty Pimpin”), released a collaborative LP with Courtney Barnett (2017’s Lotta Sea Lice), and opened shows for a pair of his heroes (John Prine, Willie Nelson.) Through it all, the Philly singer-songwriter found the time to write and record Bottle It In, with collaborators both familiar (Mary Lattimore, Kim Gordon, Stella Mozgawa) and new (producer Shawn Everett, Cass McCombs). The result is one of his best and most introspective albums to date. Vile tells Apple Music about how it all took shape.

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

In the three years since Kurt Vile released his last solo record, 2015’s B'lieve I’m Goin’ Down..., he’s enjoyed a bona fide radio hit (“Pretty Pimpin”), released a collaborative LP with Courtney Barnett (2017’s Lotta Sea Lice), and opened shows for a pair of his heroes (John Prine, Willie Nelson.) Through it all, the Philly singer-songwriter found the time to write and record Bottle It In, with collaborators both familiar (Mary Lattimore, Kim Gordon, Stella Mozgawa) and new (producer Shawn Everett, Cass McCombs). The result is one of his best and most introspective albums to date. Vile tells Apple Music about how it all took shape.

*What would you say you’ve learned this time around?*
I’m always learning things, always getting a little older and a little wiser. One of my favorite new philosophies: I realized a long time ago that I don’t force touring or songwriting. If I don’t feel it, I don’t do it. Times are insane. In a rare moment that they aren’t insane, take it really slow. Don’t move. Sit around. There’s gonna be a deadline eventually.

***This feels like one of your weirder records. The title track is a pop song but not. ***
That song came from the heart. It’s about being rejected. It’s got pop sensibility, it’s melodic—all those things. I thought I’d shave it down, but everybody that was involved, they took passes and it turned into this other thing. It was a moment of realness. It wasn’t jazz, but something orchestral, something beautiful.

***Is there a song on here that you feel particularly strongly about?***
In the three years since Kurt Vile released his last solo record, 2015’s B'lieve I’m Goin’ Down..., he’s enjoyed a bona fide radio hit (“Pretty Pimpin”), released a collaborative LP with Courtney Barnett (2017’s Lotta Sea Lice), and opened shows for a pair of his heroes (John Prine, Willie Nelson.) Through it all, the Philly singer-songwriter found the time to write and record Bottle It In, with collaborators both familiar (Mary Lattimore, Kim Gordon, Stella Mozgawa) and new (producer Shawn Everett, Cass McCombs). The result is one of his best and most introspective albums to date. Vile tells Apple Music about how it all took shape.

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
41 Ratings
41 Ratings
Nick2002

Horrible

Just talking with some guitar, silly and immature. Get real dude

AkR22

Consider me a hype-man

I know I'm not supposed to review an album before it's released but based on his track record I fully expect this album to surpass a five start rating. His albums, to me, have gotten progressively better with each new release and his last album, "B'lieve I'm going down", is his best to date. The portions of the songs you can hear on iTunes now sound great and I am very happy to see he has at least three songs on it around the 9 and 10 minute range. I love long songs. October 12th can't come soon enough!

lord spaceman

killer tunes

seriously, thats your review? Have you ever listened to Kurt before? Intricate chord structures, inventive guitar playing and amazing songwriting seperates him from all the other singer/songwriters out there..go listen to Wakin on a Pretty Daze, Smoke Ring from my Halo or Believe I'm goin' down..really listen to them and then come back and tell Kurt he is immature and to get real.

About Kurt Vile

Singer-songwriter Kurt Vile presents himself as the kind of guy who could take it or leave it. It’s not that he doesn’t try (his albums constitute some of the most exquisitely composed indie rock of the 2010s), but that his work sounds so off-the-cuff, so casual that you wonder if it all just occurred to him—what the Brazilian author Clarice Lispector described (in another context) as “simplicity with enormous effort.” Born in 1980 and raised with nine siblings in the Philadelphia suburb of Landsdowne, Vile (his real name) briefly drove a forklift before cofounding The War on Drugs with friend Adam Granduciel, leaving the band in 2008 to work on his own music. Influenced by the slanted Americana of labels like Drag City, he released a couple of home-recorded albums before making the jump to indie institution Matador in 2009, honing a quietly majestic sound that mixed classic-rock extroversion with Zen-like inner monologue, collapsing the distance between the plain (“To be frank, I’m fried”) and the profound. It’s a quality that—like the work of collaborator Courtney Barnett, with whom Vile made 2017’s joint album Lotta Sea Lice—can make Vile’s writing feel almost uncanny, rendering the everyday as something you haven’t quite seen before. In other words, he’s an artist who can write a song about looking in the mirror (2015’s “Pretty Pimpin”) and make the person in it seem a million miles away.

HOMETOWN
Lansdowne, PA
BORN
January 3, 1980

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