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Bottoms Up (The Definitive Black & Blue Sessions (Paris, France 1974))

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Album Review

Even in 1968 when the jazz avant-garde was becoming quite influential, tenor saxophonist Illinois Jacquet played in his own timeless style, performing in an idiom little changed during the previous 20 years. With the assistance of pianist Barry Harris, bassist Ben Tucker, and drummer Alan Dawson, Jacquet is heard throughout this CD reissue (which adds a previously unissued "Don't Blame Me" to the original program) swinging hard and generally expressing himself in a typically extroverted fashion. "Bottoms Up" (a relative of "Flying Home"), "Jivin' with Jack the Bellboy," and Jacquet's excellent original ballad "You Left Me All Alone" are most memorable.

Customer Reviews

Incorrect Album Title

This isn't Bottoms Up!, which featured Barry Harris and Alan Dawson as the review stated, but a date featuring Milt Buckner, as the cover art would suggest. It's still a nice overview of later period Illinois, but I'd sure like to have Bottoms Up!, which gets 5 stars from me. Hope iTMS straightens the error out.


Born: October 31, 1922 in Boussard, LA

Genre: Jazz

Years Active: '40s, '50s, '60s, '70s, '80s

One of the great tenors, Illinois Jacquet's 1942 "Flying Home" solo is considered the first R&B sax solo, and spawned a full generation of younger tenors (including Joe Houston and Big Jay McNeely) who built their careers from his style, and practically from that one song. Jacquet, whose older brother Russell (1917-1990) was a trumpeter who sometimes played in his bands, grew up in Houston, and his tough tone and emotional sound defined the Texas tenor school. After playing locally, he moved to...
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