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The Boy In the Striped Pajamas (Score from the Motion Picture)

James Horner

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Customer Reviews

i don't think you know the whole picture

i know some of you are complaining about the score and everything, but if you had seen the movie, you would know it fits perfectly. this is an extremely deep movie, that really makes you think about the horrors of nazi germany. in my opinion, the soundtrack to go with it was superb, and really perpetuated the emotions you feel through out the movie. this is a horrifyingly realistic movie. not to be mean or anything, but you should see the movie before you judge the composer.

Horner's Most Powerful Work in Years

If you had never heard another Horner score, there would be no room for "disappointment" in hearing recycled themes here. To understand Horner, though, is to understand his focus on "colors"––nuances outside of the basic melodies and harmonies themselves. He does vary themes, but most of his focus is on fine-tuning emotional manipulation. In watching any movie of his, if focused on the movie, you're not going to have any less of an emotional experience even in having seen a movie before with musical themes similar to the one at hand; Horner understands this. Once you get past his focus on color over "theme originality", you see that every score of his is worlds apart in color. This particular score, unique in its abstract "color", is also unique in that it's restrained yet powerful and unnerving, and it's consistently brooding even in its focus through a child's eyes. "Strange New Clothes", track 11, ought not to be listened to lightly, in knowing the history of the Holocaust. Though track 1 and others focus on a neo-classical theme entirely in major key, tracks 4 and 5 are of the lightest color; the neo-classical theme is warped and contorted throughout the score as the story darkens and thus grows a wary edge. Tracks 4 and 5 are clearly reminiscent of nature in their resplendent while meandering piano and synthesized vocal lines. This score can be enjoyed on many levels, but the sense of poignance, at least, is inescapable. This is not a happy score, but it is deep and important. Highly recommended, especially to those who can––or are willing to attempt to––get beyond Horner's recycled past melodic and harmonic outlines.

Is it just me or...

Does it seem like Horner uses the same theme in different scores? The same themes appear in Bicentinial Man, A Beautiful Mind, and now The Boy in the Striped Pj's. I like said themes alot but why would he use them so often?

Biography

Born: August 14, 1953 in Los Angeles, CA

Genre: Soundtrack

Years Active: '70s, '80s, '90s, '00s, '10s

Famed for his lush, sweeping scores for films including Braveheart, Apollo 13, and Titanic, the prolific composer James Horner was born in Los Angeles on August 14, 1953. Educated at London's Royal College of Music as well as local universities USC and UCLA, he landed his first motion picture assignments during the 1970s, scoring B-movies like The Lady in Red, Humanoids of the Deep, and Battle Beyond the Stars for producer Roger Corman's New World organization. By 1982, Horner had moved on to major...
Full Bio

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