11 Songs, 29 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

A Deerhoof album is usually a brain-twisting, ear-tickling exercise, and Breakup Song is no exception. What’s a bit different is the songs' emphasis on love and its complications. Deerhoof’s take on matters of the heart is sweetly sincere (if typically skewed), as singer Satomi Matsuzaki hints at foiled passions and blossoming crushes beneath her dreamy demeanor. As always, her vocals are framed by angular rhythmic patterns and fractured melodies that keep listeners pleasantly off-balance. Tunes like “Fete D’Adieu” use Greg Saunier’s minimalist beat to create a contemplative mood; others, like the Latin-inflected “The Trouble with Candyhands” or the choppy “We Do Parties,” invoke unstable emotions with astringent sounds. The experimental impulses that were present at the band’s inception are still evident, heard in the brisk synth fizz of “Bad Kids to the Front,” the singsong robot funk of “Flower," and the clattering electronica of “Mario’s Flaming Whiskers III.” The breezy “To Fly or Not to Fly” and “Mothball the Fleet” skirt the pop mainstream, reinforcing the accessible yet ever-subversive essence of this playful, ingenious, and surprisingly warm-hearted work.

EDITORS’ NOTES

A Deerhoof album is usually a brain-twisting, ear-tickling exercise, and Breakup Song is no exception. What’s a bit different is the songs' emphasis on love and its complications. Deerhoof’s take on matters of the heart is sweetly sincere (if typically skewed), as singer Satomi Matsuzaki hints at foiled passions and blossoming crushes beneath her dreamy demeanor. As always, her vocals are framed by angular rhythmic patterns and fractured melodies that keep listeners pleasantly off-balance. Tunes like “Fete D’Adieu” use Greg Saunier’s minimalist beat to create a contemplative mood; others, like the Latin-inflected “The Trouble with Candyhands” or the choppy “We Do Parties,” invoke unstable emotions with astringent sounds. The experimental impulses that were present at the band’s inception are still evident, heard in the brisk synth fizz of “Bad Kids to the Front,” the singsong robot funk of “Flower," and the clattering electronica of “Mario’s Flaming Whiskers III.” The breezy “To Fly or Not to Fly” and “Mothball the Fleet” skirt the pop mainstream, reinforcing the accessible yet ever-subversive essence of this playful, ingenious, and surprisingly warm-hearted work.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
45 Ratings
45 Ratings
artcetera ,

breakin' out, up, surround, around

how does deerhoof get better? built in propulsion, tangy tempos & super song structures that makes other bands jealous.
i am older & wise, seeing 100's &100's of shows. deerhoof was my favorite performance of 2011. saw them this past sunday
& they stunned me by being a gazillion times better, sent me into orbit! if you want to witness the paradise of a musical presentation, please see deerhoof's current tour for a tour of electrical charge. they do parties!

luv r girl ,

Deerhoof's best

It sounds crazy but I believe that this band is just now hitting their stride. This album is as catchy, well-produced, and sophisticated as anything out there right now. More importantly it is sassy, fearless, and unique. And more importantly than that it makes me want to dance.

Earnest Absurd ,

Always reliable and always interesting.

The lack of guitar may scare off all the young dudes but as a good friend of mine once said "Where there's keyboards , there be ladies!" Dancy enough for the kids but crunchy enough for the old farts at play. There are so many animal bands out there (shucks, one of them had to just settle for "Collective") and it can be hard to keep them on your shelf straight. These skinnies are the ones worth your download dollars or at least a break-in of your roommates to schlorp it off their account.

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