13 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

2009 saw Gary Go graduate from obscurity into nascent stardom thanks to a series of U.K. dates opening for Take That. Go builds upon this breakthrough with his self-titled debut album, a seamless pop confection made distinctive by his guileless vocals and self-revealing lyrics. Gary Go often seems like an extended therapy session, revisiting themes of abandonment (“Brooklyn”), personal boundaries (“Speak”), and free-floating ennui (“So So”) again and again. Go manages to convey resolve while fighting off despair, pulling at the threads of hope running through even his glummest songs. He’s helped considerably by the sparkling rhythmic drive propelling his tunes, especially on anthemic numbers like “Wonderful,” “Engines,” and “Heart and Soul.” Texture-wise the tracks range from quietly jazzy (“Honest”) to assertively rocking (“Refuse to Lose”), and the wistful, slide guitar-accented “Black and White Days” is the closest thing to a love song here. At his best, Gary Go breaks out of his pervasive melancholy and surges on a wave of optimism, sweeping the listener along for the ride.

EDITORS’ NOTES

2009 saw Gary Go graduate from obscurity into nascent stardom thanks to a series of U.K. dates opening for Take That. Go builds upon this breakthrough with his self-titled debut album, a seamless pop confection made distinctive by his guileless vocals and self-revealing lyrics. Gary Go often seems like an extended therapy session, revisiting themes of abandonment (“Brooklyn”), personal boundaries (“Speak”), and free-floating ennui (“So So”) again and again. Go manages to convey resolve while fighting off despair, pulling at the threads of hope running through even his glummest songs. He’s helped considerably by the sparkling rhythmic drive propelling his tunes, especially on anthemic numbers like “Wonderful,” “Engines,” and “Heart and Soul.” Texture-wise the tracks range from quietly jazzy (“Honest”) to assertively rocking (“Refuse to Lose”), and the wistful, slide guitar-accented “Black and White Days” is the closest thing to a love song here. At his best, Gary Go breaks out of his pervasive melancholy and surges on a wave of optimism, sweeping the listener along for the ride.

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4:59
4:20
3:55
5:10
4:05
3:35
4:03
4:28
3:54
5:01
3:30
4:11
3:23

About Gary Go

With his geek-chic image and heartfelt guitar ballads, London native Gary Go received his big break in 2009, when Take That offered him an opening slot on the group's summer tour. The son of a producer for Jim Henson's The Muppet Show, Gary Baker (who was given the moniker Go by a family friend) grew up within earshot of Wembley Stadium. Influenced by the live music performed there, he began writing songs at the age of eight and taught himself how to play several instruments. After leaving school, he began working at Dave Stewart's recording studio, but following some advice from Peter Gabriel at a job interview, decided to concentrate on his own music. Setting up his own indie label, Canvas Room, he recorded The So So EP, which attracted the attention of a New Jersey producer who invited him to record material at his studio. Inspired by living in the same house where Frank Sinatra grew up, he recorded a second EP, entitled The Diary of Rodney Harvey, before moving back home. Following several showcases in London, Gary Go signed to Decca Records, coincidentally also the home of Peter Gabriel, and supported Amy Macdonald, the Script, and the Feeling on their U.K. tours. Following the success of his debut single, "Wonderful" (number 25), he was personally invited to warm up for Take That on their record-breaking stadium shows. His self-titled debut album appeared in mid-2009. ~ Jon O'Brien

  • ORIGIN
    London, England

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