12 Songs, 53 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Back in 2001 when Oakland’s Call and Response debuted their eponymous album, the quintet garnered many comparisons to the Mamas & The Papas — but listen to their approach at hitting those lilting vocal harmonies sung over simple baroque-pop played through vintage instruments and it’s evident that the band had more in common with sunshine-pop luminaries the Free Design. Lead singer Carrie Clough’s beautifully plaintive voice recalls a young Karen Carpenter at times, especially when contrasted against the bubbly electro-pop of “Rollerskate” and the robo-funk of “Lightbulb.” On the instantly danceable “All Night Long” bass player Terri Loewenthal locks into unpredictable time-signatures with drummer Jordan Dalrymple while guitar player Dan Judd lets loose some tastefully toned guitar melodies. Analogue keyboard fetishes flourish, especially on the “Mr. Tambourine Man”-derived “Colors” where it sounds like a Moog and Wurlitzer are going head-to-head from inside a children’s bouncy castle. The twangy “California Floating In Space” is punctuated by Japancakes’ pedal-steel player John Neff.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Back in 2001 when Oakland’s Call and Response debuted their eponymous album, the quintet garnered many comparisons to the Mamas & The Papas — but listen to their approach at hitting those lilting vocal harmonies sung over simple baroque-pop played through vintage instruments and it’s evident that the band had more in common with sunshine-pop luminaries the Free Design. Lead singer Carrie Clough’s beautifully plaintive voice recalls a young Karen Carpenter at times, especially when contrasted against the bubbly electro-pop of “Rollerskate” and the robo-funk of “Lightbulb.” On the instantly danceable “All Night Long” bass player Terri Loewenthal locks into unpredictable time-signatures with drummer Jordan Dalrymple while guitar player Dan Judd lets loose some tastefully toned guitar melodies. Analogue keyboard fetishes flourish, especially on the “Mr. Tambourine Man”-derived “Colors” where it sounds like a Moog and Wurlitzer are going head-to-head from inside a children’s bouncy castle. The twangy “California Floating In Space” is punctuated by Japancakes’ pedal-steel player John Neff.

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About Call and Response

With their combination of electronic pop and sixties sunshine pop/rock, Call and Response's cheerful harmonies and good-time fun reflect the happier side of their native California. Added to their influences of The Cardigans, Stereolab and Weezer, Call and Response's junction of dual male/ female vocal exchanges are featured on their first single "Rollerskate," which was released on Shelflife Records in January of 2000. The self-titled debut followed on Kindercore a year later. Winds Take No Shape marked the band's first release for Badman in 2004. ~ Mike DaRonco

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