11 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Third time might be the charm for Austin tunesmith Carrie Elkin. Her third studio album is also her first for folk label Red House Records. It opens with “Jesse Likes Birds” which cleverly borrows from the traditional lullaby “Hush, Little Baby” before breaking into a barn-burning bluegrass jam toward the end. The aptly titled Call It My Garden is a bountiful harvest of twangy Americana, rootsy country-folk and Appalachian-inspired moments of string-band gold. “Lift Up the Anchor” is a beautifully melancholic ballad where long swells of the pedal steel’s notes seem to be weeping over organic instruments like stand-up bass, cello, acoustic guitar and Elkin singing some of the prettiest harmonies on the album. “The Things We’re Afraid of” similarly reveals that Elkin’s strengths are in her slower, sadder musings – her voice does a natural tremolo when there’s room for her textured inflections to stretch out and relax. She pumps some warm blood into Dar Williams’ “Iowa” (the original sounds a bit too polite in comparison). “Edge of the World” bookends with tuneful dobro sliding over a romantic waltz.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Third time might be the charm for Austin tunesmith Carrie Elkin. Her third studio album is also her first for folk label Red House Records. It opens with “Jesse Likes Birds” which cleverly borrows from the traditional lullaby “Hush, Little Baby” before breaking into a barn-burning bluegrass jam toward the end. The aptly titled Call It My Garden is a bountiful harvest of twangy Americana, rootsy country-folk and Appalachian-inspired moments of string-band gold. “Lift Up the Anchor” is a beautifully melancholic ballad where long swells of the pedal steel’s notes seem to be weeping over organic instruments like stand-up bass, cello, acoustic guitar and Elkin singing some of the prettiest harmonies on the album. “The Things We’re Afraid of” similarly reveals that Elkin’s strengths are in her slower, sadder musings – her voice does a natural tremolo when there’s room for her textured inflections to stretch out and relax. She pumps some warm blood into Dar Williams’ “Iowa” (the original sounds a bit too polite in comparison). “Edge of the World” bookends with tuneful dobro sliding over a romantic waltz.

TITLE TIME
4:26
3:43
3:29
3:16
4:51
3:51
2:43
5:10
2:53
2:46
5:09

About Carrie Elkin

Compared to Patty Griffin, Iris DeMent, and Nanci Griffith by legendary Radio 2 DJ Bob Harris, singer/songwriter Carrie Elkin's unique sound incorporates alt-country, Americana, and traditional folk with heartfelt poetic lyrics. Born in Cleveland, OH in 1974, Elkin began playing the saxophone and singing at her local church from a young age before competing as a National Champion acro gymnast. After studying physiology at Ohio University, and working as an organic chemist, she decided to concentrate on a musical career, and embarked on a nomadic lifestyle which lasted for over a decade, performing in various clubs and recording several self-funded albums, including 1996 debut Simplicity, 2001's Live at the Front Room, and 2004's The Waltz, before finally settling in Austin, TX in 2007. Following the positive response to her fifth LP, The Jeopardy of Circumstance, she toured both the U.S. and U.K. extensively, appeared on several of partner Danny Schmidt's albums, and signed to Grammy Award-winning folk label Red House Records in 2010, the same year she released her most recognized and critically acclaimed work, Call It My Garden. ~ Jon O'Brien

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