14 Songs, 56 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ten years after their last studio album, The Mavericks returned with 2013's In Time, a brilliant showcase that proves classic sounds and timeless songwriting never go out of fashion. Singer Raul Malo leads things with his Elvis Presley/Roy Orbison–like command of the vocal mic, while his Nashville folks back him with a musical vocabulary that can play anything with spirit and inspiration. Right from the Tex-Mex keyboard-inspired "Back in Your Arms Again," the band is so well-oiled that the song slides across the dance floor. "Lies" (not The Knickerbockers' garage rock hit) cruises along despite its heartbreak and betrayal. "Born to Be Blue"—which sounds like it's from a lost Roy Orbison album—could have been recorded five decades ago if not for the added fidelity of a full-spectrum stereo mix, where every instrument is in focus but still part of the blend. "All Over Again" throws mariachi and ska together in one quick punch. The reverb is thick and real for "Come Unto Me," which recalls surf rock and spaghetti westerns. The Mavericks' natural abilities make everything sound effortless. 

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ten years after their last studio album, The Mavericks returned with 2013's In Time, a brilliant showcase that proves classic sounds and timeless songwriting never go out of fashion. Singer Raul Malo leads things with his Elvis Presley/Roy Orbison–like command of the vocal mic, while his Nashville folks back him with a musical vocabulary that can play anything with spirit and inspiration. Right from the Tex-Mex keyboard-inspired "Back in Your Arms Again," the band is so well-oiled that the song slides across the dance floor. "Lies" (not The Knickerbockers' garage rock hit) cruises along despite its heartbreak and betrayal. "Born to Be Blue"—which sounds like it's from a lost Roy Orbison album—could have been recorded five decades ago if not for the added fidelity of a full-spectrum stereo mix, where every instrument is in focus but still part of the blend. "All Over Again" throws mariachi and ska together in one quick punch. The reverb is thick and real for "Come Unto Me," which recalls surf rock and spaghetti westerns. The Mavericks' natural abilities make everything sound effortless. 

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
293 Ratings
293 Ratings
Heat Meiser ,

Amazing...

It's been way overdue for The Mavs to get back together. This movie isn't just a love letter to it's fans, it's a love letter for a time when music was something special to listen to. As a society we are programmed to tear things apart, nitpick things, and poke holes in something that's truly great. However, there are always exceptions to that rule and this album is definitely one of those rare exceptions. This album was made for fans of great music, period. Don't let any genre-heads fool you and tell you it should fit in x or y peg. From top to bottom, this album is an instant classic. You should buy this immediately.

Mikey Sayz ,

Raul Malo is a treasure

It's great to hear the voice of Raul Malo, back where he belongs, fronting for the Mavericks. Their classic country Tex-Mex sound is unparalleled, and is right on time on this one.

Lbsp123 ,

What is this...

I haven't heard something like this spectacular in a long time.

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