11 Songs, 48 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Mixing the sublime with the ironic, Suckers serve up tasty, slightly unnerving pop confections on their sophomore album, Candy Salad. The Brooklyn quartet tones down the odder elements found on their debut release with the aid of MGMT producer Matt Boynton, but Candy Salad’s shapely melodies and prominent hooks don’t completely disguise the band’s eccentricities. Familiar classic rock gestures of the ‘60s and ‘70s are tweaked and twisted here, both lyrically and musically; it results in tracks that wrap intense sweetness around a prickly core. Buoyant, synth-drizzled tunes like “Turn on the Sunshine,” “Figure It Out," and “Leave the Light On” uplift the listener with chiming guitars and tinkling pianos, even as singer Quinn Walker undercuts his romantic musings with surreal, paranoia-tinged asides. Suckers are masterful at embroidering their tracks with colorful sonic filigree, as evidenced by the faux-Asian stylings of “Bricks to the Bones” and the Bowie-like lounge soul of “Chinese Braille.” The band achieves the most direct hit with “Going Nowhere,” a revved-up slice of power pop longing that’s both mopey and joyous.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Mixing the sublime with the ironic, Suckers serve up tasty, slightly unnerving pop confections on their sophomore album, Candy Salad. The Brooklyn quartet tones down the odder elements found on their debut release with the aid of MGMT producer Matt Boynton, but Candy Salad’s shapely melodies and prominent hooks don’t completely disguise the band’s eccentricities. Familiar classic rock gestures of the ‘60s and ‘70s are tweaked and twisted here, both lyrically and musically; it results in tracks that wrap intense sweetness around a prickly core. Buoyant, synth-drizzled tunes like “Turn on the Sunshine,” “Figure It Out," and “Leave the Light On” uplift the listener with chiming guitars and tinkling pianos, even as singer Quinn Walker undercuts his romantic musings with surreal, paranoia-tinged asides. Suckers are masterful at embroidering their tracks with colorful sonic filigree, as evidenced by the faux-Asian stylings of “Bricks to the Bones” and the Bowie-like lounge soul of “Chinese Braille.” The band achieves the most direct hit with “Going Nowhere,” a revved-up slice of power pop longing that’s both mopey and joyous.

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