43 Songs, 2 Hours 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Tim McGraw has sewn together the sum of all three of his hits compilations for this epic triptych. At 43 tracks deep, some may consider it a box set — but this one comprises nothing but the hits and offers no bonus treats save for the ones that initially came with the singular collections. But whether longtime fan or a newcomer to McGraw's ever-evolving brand of new traditional twang, you'll find a solid grip of tunes here that will have you stomping those boot heels or salting your beers with honky-tonk tears. It's all sequenced chronologically, though opening with the controversial "Indian Outlaw" may not be the most ideal way to set the tone for a man whose music has come such a long way since. "Don't Take the Girl" might have made for a better intro. A slower number built on dated soft rock production, it hints at the captivating narratives and dynamic vocal range that McGraw would build on throughout his career to birth more notables like "Let's Make Love" (with wife Faith Hill) and the deeply inspirational "Live Like You Were Dying." For those about to rock, try "Nine Lives." Def Leppard backing McGraw? You can't make country rock much harder than this.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Tim McGraw has sewn together the sum of all three of his hits compilations for this epic triptych. At 43 tracks deep, some may consider it a box set — but this one comprises nothing but the hits and offers no bonus treats save for the ones that initially came with the singular collections. But whether longtime fan or a newcomer to McGraw's ever-evolving brand of new traditional twang, you'll find a solid grip of tunes here that will have you stomping those boot heels or salting your beers with honky-tonk tears. It's all sequenced chronologically, though opening with the controversial "Indian Outlaw" may not be the most ideal way to set the tone for a man whose music has come such a long way since. "Don't Take the Girl" might have made for a better intro. A slower number built on dated soft rock production, it hints at the captivating narratives and dynamic vocal range that McGraw would build on throughout his career to birth more notables like "Let's Make Love" (with wife Faith Hill) and the deeply inspirational "Live Like You Were Dying." For those about to rock, try "Nine Lives." Def Leppard backing McGraw? You can't make country rock much harder than this.

TITLE TIME
15

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