10 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The ‘80s were a tough era for rock bands. A “roots rock” band such as the Del-Lords, who depended on two tough guitars and a driving, no-nonsense rhythm section, were likely to get lost in an era of flashy keyboards, horn sections and gaudy female backing vocal ensembles. Yet, they valiantly soldiered on, slickening up the sound just enough to sound radio-compatible, if not exactly radio-friendly, with producer Neil Geraldo (Pat Benatar) once again aiding the band’s quest for the perfect balance. “Judas Kiss,” sung by the band’s lead guitarist, Eric “Roscoe” Ambel, kept a strong, erect R&B backbone and tracks such as “River of Justice” (featuring the huckster-jive of Mojo Mixon and backing support of Syd Straw), “Whole Lotta Nothin’ Goin’ On” and “Cheyenne” cruise with the band’s blue-collar politics coursing through their frustrated working- man veins. A true band effort.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The ‘80s were a tough era for rock bands. A “roots rock” band such as the Del-Lords, who depended on two tough guitars and a driving, no-nonsense rhythm section, were likely to get lost in an era of flashy keyboards, horn sections and gaudy female backing vocal ensembles. Yet, they valiantly soldiered on, slickening up the sound just enough to sound radio-compatible, if not exactly radio-friendly, with producer Neil Geraldo (Pat Benatar) once again aiding the band’s quest for the perfect balance. “Judas Kiss,” sung by the band’s lead guitarist, Eric “Roscoe” Ambel, kept a strong, erect R&B backbone and tracks such as “River of Justice” (featuring the huckster-jive of Mojo Mixon and backing support of Syd Straw), “Whole Lotta Nothin’ Goin’ On” and “Cheyenne” cruise with the band’s blue-collar politics coursing through their frustrated working- man veins. A true band effort.

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