Choir of Echoes by Peggy Sue on Apple Music

13 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

It’s clear that Peggy Sue are meant to elude. The playful trio of singer/guitarists Rosa Slade and Katy Young and drummer Olly Joyce have no interest in finding a prescribed sound and sticking to it. Sure, there’s the lightness of their singing voices that attaches to everything they touch—but the gentle bounce of songs like “Substitute” and “Figure of Eight” can easily shift to the more atmospheric night skies of “Always Going” and the doo-wop arc of “Longest Day of the Year Blues.” They still tilt toward a Camera Obscura pop sense in “Just the Night” with great ease. “(Come Back Around)" even spends 90 seconds working as a wordless choir to introduce the album. Produced by Jimmy Robertson at the legendary Rockfield Studio in South Wales and mixed by longtime collaborator John Askew, Choir of Echoes, the trio’s fourth album, flirts and dances with as many varieties of sweetness as a well-stocked ice cream parlor. Even the country harmonies of “How Heavy the Quiet That Grew Between Your Mouth and Mine” exudes a sense of playful beauty, despite the ominous string arrangement that emerges slowly into the frame.

EDITORS’ NOTES

It’s clear that Peggy Sue are meant to elude. The playful trio of singer/guitarists Rosa Slade and Katy Young and drummer Olly Joyce have no interest in finding a prescribed sound and sticking to it. Sure, there’s the lightness of their singing voices that attaches to everything they touch—but the gentle bounce of songs like “Substitute” and “Figure of Eight” can easily shift to the more atmospheric night skies of “Always Going” and the doo-wop arc of “Longest Day of the Year Blues.” They still tilt toward a Camera Obscura pop sense in “Just the Night” with great ease. “(Come Back Around)" even spends 90 seconds working as a wordless choir to introduce the album. Produced by Jimmy Robertson at the legendary Rockfield Studio in South Wales and mixed by longtime collaborator John Askew, Choir of Echoes, the trio’s fourth album, flirts and dances with as many varieties of sweetness as a well-stocked ice cream parlor. Even the country harmonies of “How Heavy the Quiet That Grew Between Your Mouth and Mine” exudes a sense of playful beauty, despite the ominous string arrangement that emerges slowly into the frame.

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1:30
3:26
3:34
4:03
4:38
3:34
1:57
4:16
3:09
4:42
3:36
4:11
3:51

About Peggy Sue

Brighton, England indie folk duo Peggy Sue was formed by longtime friends Rosa Slade and Katy Young. The group's signature blend of brooding anti-folk and fiery indie pop was born in basements, living rooms, and small clubs in 2006. A successful tour with like-minded British indie rockers Mumford & Sons earned Peggy Sue attention outside of the local scene, resulting in a record deal with Yep Roc in the States, and Wichita Records in the U.K.. The band’s debut album, Fossils and Other Phantoms, was released in June 2010, with Acrobats arriving the following year. Their widely praised sophomore record took a step away from the slightly twee folk sound of their debut and introduced electric guitars and moody, indie rock-influenced melodies that were bolstered by the addition of drummer Olly Joyce. Toward the end of 2011 they performed at a temporary cinema in Hackney, London, where they played an interpretation of the rock & roll soundtrack to cult film Scorpio Rising. They went into the studio with Jimmy Robertson to record the versions, which appeared as a limited-edition run of LPs in 2012. The trio took their time to write their third studio release and returned to the studio with Robertson in 2013 to lay down tracks for Choir of Echoes, which arrived in January 2014. ~ James Christopher Monger & Scott Kerr

  • ORIGIN
    Brighton, England
  • FORMED
    2006

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