13 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

It’s clear that Peggy Sue are meant to elude. The playful trio of singer/guitarists Rosa Slade and Katy Young and drummer Olly Joyce have no interest in finding a prescribed sound and sticking to it. Sure, there’s the lightness of their singing voices that attaches to everything they touch—but the gentle bounce of songs like “Substitute” and “Figure of Eight” can easily shift to the more atmospheric night skies of “Always Going” and the doo-wop arc of “Longest Day of the Year Blues.” They still tilt toward a Camera Obscura pop sense in “Just the Night” with great ease. “(Come Back Around)" even spends 90 seconds working as a wordless choir to introduce the album. Produced by Jimmy Robertson at the legendary Rockfield Studio in South Wales and mixed by longtime collaborator John Askew, Choir of Echoes, the trio’s fourth album, flirts and dances with as many varieties of sweetness as a well-stocked ice cream parlor. Even the country harmonies of “How Heavy the Quiet That Grew Between Your Mouth and Mine” exudes a sense of playful beauty, despite the ominous string arrangement that emerges slowly into the frame.

EDITORS’ NOTES

It’s clear that Peggy Sue are meant to elude. The playful trio of singer/guitarists Rosa Slade and Katy Young and drummer Olly Joyce have no interest in finding a prescribed sound and sticking to it. Sure, there’s the lightness of their singing voices that attaches to everything they touch—but the gentle bounce of songs like “Substitute” and “Figure of Eight” can easily shift to the more atmospheric night skies of “Always Going” and the doo-wop arc of “Longest Day of the Year Blues.” They still tilt toward a Camera Obscura pop sense in “Just the Night” with great ease. “(Come Back Around)" even spends 90 seconds working as a wordless choir to introduce the album. Produced by Jimmy Robertson at the legendary Rockfield Studio in South Wales and mixed by longtime collaborator John Askew, Choir of Echoes, the trio’s fourth album, flirts and dances with as many varieties of sweetness as a well-stocked ice cream parlor. Even the country harmonies of “How Heavy the Quiet That Grew Between Your Mouth and Mine” exudes a sense of playful beauty, despite the ominous string arrangement that emerges slowly into the frame.

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