11 Songs, 32 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Known in the U.K. for his understated sense of self in an arena of self-important pop stars, Eugene McGuinness, on his third solo album Chroma, sounds like a brash craftsman who isn’t afraid of making bold moves. “Immortals” channels the cowbell of classic rock with broad guitar riffs and in-your-face vocals that demand attention. Chroma is loaded with attitude and big vocals and harmonies. “Godiva” mutates the riff from The Beatles’ “Day Tripper” until it sounds like a Black Keys idea. “I Drink Your Milkshake” uses the basic muscle of bass guitar and drums to create a mock seriousness that flourishes as the chorus never breaks character. “The Crueller Kind” sounds like a pop hit you can’t quite place. “Deception of the Crush” suggests a literate pop fan with his roots in The Kinks and Blur and a desire to find his own place in that vocabulary. “Black Stang” bashes it out to the finish line. 

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Known in the U.K. for his understated sense of self in an arena of self-important pop stars, Eugene McGuinness, on his third solo album Chroma, sounds like a brash craftsman who isn’t afraid of making bold moves. “Immortals” channels the cowbell of classic rock with broad guitar riffs and in-your-face vocals that demand attention. Chroma is loaded with attitude and big vocals and harmonies. “Godiva” mutates the riff from The Beatles’ “Day Tripper” until it sounds like a Black Keys idea. “I Drink Your Milkshake” uses the basic muscle of bass guitar and drums to create a mock seriousness that flourishes as the chorus never breaks character. “The Crueller Kind” sounds like a pop hit you can’t quite place. “Deception of the Crush” suggests a literate pop fan with his roots in The Kinks and Blur and a desire to find his own place in that vocabulary. “Black Stang” bashes it out to the finish line. 

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

About Eugene McGuinness

Armed with a truly outstanding debut single, "Monsters Under the Bed," that recalls artists ranging from Odelay-era Beck to '80s U.K. cult heroes the Television Personalities, Eugene McGuinness appeared rather out of nowhere in 2007, seeming like he might be the Damon Albarn of the current set of neo-Brit-popsters following in the wake of the Arctic Monkeys and Franz Ferdinand. Like Albarn, McGuinness is a singer and songwriter of varied tastes whose talents extend beyond what's currently fashionable, with an eye for mixing and matching unexpected influences (in an early interview, he claimed to be equally enamored of Broadway master Stephen Sondheim and U.K. grime star Dizzee Rascal, and elements of both appear in his music) into a unique personal style. Born in 1985 in London to Northern Irish parents and raised in Liverpool, McGuinness started writing songs in his mid-teens. By the age of 20, McGuinness was signed to the publishing arm of the hottest British indie label of the time, Domino Records. In early 2007, Domino formed a special subsidiary label, Double Six Records, to release McGuinness' debut single, a nervy, synth-driven ode to information overload and insomnia. A BBC Radio 1 session followed in the spring after the single's immediate success, and an eight-track mini-album, The Early Learnings of Eugene McGuinness, was released by Double Six in the summer. McGuinness' eponymous sophomore effort arrived the following year. Glue, a collaboration with Eugene's brother Dominic McGuinness, was released under the moniker Eugene and the Lizards in 2009. It was followed in 2012 by McGuinness' third studio outing, The Invitation to the Voyage, and in 2014 by Chroma. ~ Stewart Mason

HOMETOWN
London, England

Songs

Albums

Videos

Listeners Also Bought