10 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Street Dreams still divides Chet Atkins fans, which is one reason you know it’s worth paying attention to. Atkins made this music to appeal to an audience that might have never heard his canonical country recordings, with help from a team of veteran producers, players, and arrangements drawn from the jazz world—including Ronnie Foster, Daryl Dybka, and George and Eduardo Del Barrio. Guitarist Earl Klugh was one of the people to coax Atkins into the world of soft jazz, and it’s still amazing to see how effortlessly Chet’s style fits in the context of “(Like A) Crystal in the Light,” “Street Dreams," and “The Official Beach Music,” the last of which approaches a dapper funk not dissimilar to Michael Jackson(!). The new musical setting was a turnoff for some longtime Atkins devotees, but no one could accuse Chet of selling out. His playing here is just as sensitive and focused as anything he did in the preceding decades. And while the emphasis is on hushed and sultry jazz pieces, the purists can always turn to “Honolulu Blue,” a whimsical solo piece that reaffirms Atkins’ longstanding respect for the slack-key tradition.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Street Dreams still divides Chet Atkins fans, which is one reason you know it’s worth paying attention to. Atkins made this music to appeal to an audience that might have never heard his canonical country recordings, with help from a team of veteran producers, players, and arrangements drawn from the jazz world—including Ronnie Foster, Daryl Dybka, and George and Eduardo Del Barrio. Guitarist Earl Klugh was one of the people to coax Atkins into the world of soft jazz, and it’s still amazing to see how effortlessly Chet’s style fits in the context of “(Like A) Crystal in the Light,” “Street Dreams," and “The Official Beach Music,” the last of which approaches a dapper funk not dissimilar to Michael Jackson(!). The new musical setting was a turnoff for some longtime Atkins devotees, but no one could accuse Chet of selling out. His playing here is just as sensitive and focused as anything he did in the preceding decades. And while the emphasis is on hushed and sultry jazz pieces, the purists can always turn to “Honolulu Blue,” a whimsical solo piece that reaffirms Atkins’ longstanding respect for the slack-key tradition.

TITLE TIME

More By Chet Atkins

You May Also Like