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The New Danger

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Editors’ Notes

Like his peers Andre 3000 and Common, Mos Def has created an album that intends to transcend rap and incorporate several decades of African-American music. “Freaky Black Greetings” and “The Easy Spell” are among the tracks that feature Black Jack Johnson, Mos Def’s aggregate backing band featuring members of Living Colour, Bad Brains, and Funkadelic. While the band’s amalgamation of heavy metal, blues, and funk is sharply different from his old style, the music roils with all the dark energy you would expect from a group of superior talent. Even as he ventures into uncharted territory, Mos keeps one foot firmly planted in his hip-hop past. “Sex, Love & Money,” “Close Edge” and “Life Is Real” recall the author’s well-loved work with Black Star, while “The Beggar” and “The Panties” are soulful excursions that extend the atmosphere of “Umi Says,” from Black on Both Sides. The album’s best tracks are “Zimzallabim” and “War,” glorious mergers of full-band funk and sly beats that reconcile Mos Def’s aggravated adventurousness with his purist spirit.

Customer Reviews

Probably the best album ever made.

Okay, lyrically/hip-hopilly this album isnt as strong as Black on Both sides (except for Close Edge). However, Poetically this album is AMAZING. I dont usually capitalize things, but i just did. Some people say this album mimics Limp Bizkit, however, if one pays close attention you can tell that Mos Def's major topic on this album is that Black artists should perform Black music. War- the song that is being referred to as "Limpbizkitish" is actually a Diss towards Bizkit. Quite well planned, if you ask me. It shows Bizkit's lack of Soul (Ala: "F*ck You, Pay Me... Gimme the Loot Gimme the Loot") I personally love the soul Mos def has put in this album. However, i agree, it is well beyond its time. Be more OPEN MINDED, you will love this album!

Keep it coming

This is a great record. Very creative, thank God. Compared to what the record industry pushes as hip hop, this is a breath of fresh air. To the person who said "This is not Mos Def , this is totally different ..." think about what a narrow minded statement that is. To anyone who would compare this to Limp Bizkit, do some research! Dr. Know was in Bad Brains, a black punk rock/dub reggae band of the 80's that paved the way for EVERY SINGLE rap/rock hybrid that followed, Bernie Worrell was in the greatsest black rock band EVER - Funkadelic, Doug and Will carried that torch admirably in Living Colour. Essentially, this band was playing the music that Limp Bizkit would later rip off, when Limp Bizkit was either still swimmin' in daddy's sack, in diapers, or in middle school. Are you really gonna compare Fred Durst on the mic to Mos Def? Good luck! Anybody who's upset that this record is'nt B.O.B.S. needs to check out Miles Davis, John Coltrane and Thelonious Monk , for starters. This record taps into that kind of vision. It's very good. Good job Mos!

Creativity Should Always Get A 5

So its not a hip hop album, really. Its got a more N'Awleans feeling to it... Limp Bizkit I think not. Its just plain groovy. If you only listen to hip hop, and can't respect other genres of music, kick yourself in the rear, and then go buy a tupac album. If you enjoy listening to great, creative music that excels past the boundries of catagories, then this album will not dissapoint!


Born: December 11, 1973 in Brooklyn, NY

Genre: Hip-Hop/Rap

Years Active: '90s, '00s, '10s

Initially regarded as one of the most promising rappers to emerge in the late '90s, Mos Def turned to acting in subsequent years as music became a secondary concern for him. He did release new music from time to time, including albums such as The New Danger (2004), but his output was erratic and seemingly governed by whim. Mos Def nonetheless continued to draw attention, especially from critics and underground rap fans, and his classic breakthrough albums -- Black Star (1998), a collaboration with...
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