C'mon! by Keith Anderson on Apple Music

11 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

Nashville country hunks these days are as unavoidable as cow chips at a livestock show. Keith Anderson distinguishes himself from the pack by virtue of his unaffected persona and well-honed songwriting. While there’s nothing on his second album C’mon! that’s radically new, he invests enough craft and individuality in its tracks to set them apart from typical commercial country fare. He brings real gusto and wit to the album’s title track, a hard-pumping party anthem overflowing with long necks and leggy ladies. The rambunctious kiss-off tune “Break My Heart” makes it clear that Keith is no love-struck fool. For the most part, though, C’mon! is devoted to expressions of wistful regret and smoldering passion. Anderson’s light tenor vocals (accented with falsetto at key moments) lend sincerity to romantic numbers like “She Could’ve Been Mine,” “I Still Miss You,” and the R&B-tinged “Lost In This Moment With You.” Narratives like “Adaliene” and “Closest I’ve Ever Been” show Anderson to be an adept writer with a keen eye for detail. True, there isn’t much grit in his depiction of life and love, but Anderson’s solid virtues make his C’mon! an appealing invitation all the same.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Nashville country hunks these days are as unavoidable as cow chips at a livestock show. Keith Anderson distinguishes himself from the pack by virtue of his unaffected persona and well-honed songwriting. While there’s nothing on his second album C’mon! that’s radically new, he invests enough craft and individuality in its tracks to set them apart from typical commercial country fare. He brings real gusto and wit to the album’s title track, a hard-pumping party anthem overflowing with long necks and leggy ladies. The rambunctious kiss-off tune “Break My Heart” makes it clear that Keith is no love-struck fool. For the most part, though, C’mon! is devoted to expressions of wistful regret and smoldering passion. Anderson’s light tenor vocals (accented with falsetto at key moments) lend sincerity to romantic numbers like “She Could’ve Been Mine,” “I Still Miss You,” and the R&B-tinged “Lost In This Moment With You.” Narratives like “Adaliene” and “Closest I’ve Ever Been” show Anderson to be an adept writer with a keen eye for detail. True, there isn’t much grit in his depiction of life and love, but Anderson’s solid virtues make his C’mon! an appealing invitation all the same.

TITLE TIME
3:33
3:46
4:06
4:04
4:51
3:55
3:26
3:24
3:45
4:33
3:45

About Keith Anderson

Women swoon every time hunky country heartthrob Keith Anderson takes the stage, but despite his good looks, Anderson's first big country music break was a behind-the-scenes job. Born near the Ozark Mountains in Miami, OK, Anderson grew up listening to the Southern-fried sound of Lynyrd Skynyrd and Molly Hatchet along with numerous hair metal bands. A copy of Willie Nelson's Red Headed Stranger turned Anderson's attention toward country music. He started writing country songs and envisioned himself as country music star, but he was getting more attention for his baseball-playing skills, so much so that the Kansas City Royals approached him after one of his high-school games. A shoulder injury ended his baseball career, but his physical rehabilitation program led to an interest in bodybuilding, which led to him becoming the runner-up in the Mr. Oklahoma contest and, eventually, a part-time catalog model. After moving to Dallas, Anderson hit the local nightclub stages while working various day jobs.

Writing ad jingles for local radio became his first paying gig in music. The pay wasn't great, but that he was paid at all was enough of an inspiration for Anderson to quit his day job and head for Nashville. Playing around town introduced him to some of the local professional songwriters, most notably George Ducas. Writing a couple songs with the well-revered Ducas was a big endorsement for Anderson, and soon every publishing house in Nashville was aware of him. A couple minor appearances on various albums appeared before Anderson hit pay dirt with "Beer Run," a tune that was recorded as a duet by Garth Brooks and George Jones in 2001. Anderson felt he now had the clout to become an artist on his own, and started approaching labels. It took a while, but eventually Arista Nashville came calling. The label issued Anderson's debut, Three Chord Country and American Rock & Roll, in 2005. ~ David Jeffries

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