13 Songs, 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Whether you see Sons of Anarchy as a viable extension of the Hells Angels/Sonny Barger story or The Sopranos on motorcycles, there’s no doubt that the series packs a stellar soundtrack. The second collection of songs opens with Jane's Addiction doing an extended cover of The Rolling Stones’ “Sympathy for the Devil.” Noah Gunderson’s harrowing ballad “Family” is a haunting serenade serving as a stark reminder that sometimes even a ruthless motorcycle gang (or club, rather) makes for a better family than one’s relatives. The series' house band, The Forest Rangers, dominate the soundtrack with an awesome array of guests. Alison Mosshart of The Kills and The Dead Weather takes the mic and delivers a smoldering rendition of Iggy Pop’s “The Passenger” before Katey "Peg Bundy" Sagal kisses new life into the 1967 Lulu chestnut "To Sir, with Love." When Scars on Broadway’s Frankie Perez jumps in the vocal booth, he turns Stevie Wonder’s “Higher Ground" into an outlaw country/soul hybrid. No matter who happens to be fronting The Forest Rangers, the band’s versatility in musicianship keeps everything from sounding like studio karaoke.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Whether you see Sons of Anarchy as a viable extension of the Hells Angels/Sonny Barger story or The Sopranos on motorcycles, there’s no doubt that the series packs a stellar soundtrack. The second collection of songs opens with Jane's Addiction doing an extended cover of The Rolling Stones’ “Sympathy for the Devil.” Noah Gunderson’s harrowing ballad “Family” is a haunting serenade serving as a stark reminder that sometimes even a ruthless motorcycle gang (or club, rather) makes for a better family than one’s relatives. The series' house band, The Forest Rangers, dominate the soundtrack with an awesome array of guests. Alison Mosshart of The Kills and The Dead Weather takes the mic and delivers a smoldering rendition of Iggy Pop’s “The Passenger” before Katey "Peg Bundy" Sagal kisses new life into the 1967 Lulu chestnut "To Sir, with Love." When Scars on Broadway’s Frankie Perez jumps in the vocal booth, he turns Stevie Wonder’s “Higher Ground" into an outlaw country/soul hybrid. No matter who happens to be fronting The Forest Rangers, the band’s versatility in musicianship keeps everything from sounding like studio karaoke.

TITLE TIME
5:26
3:26
4:41
3:30
3:21
3:54
3:45
4:11
5:13
2:36
2:17
3:33
4:23

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