12 Songs, 32 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

On NOFX’s 11th studio long-player “We Called It America” breaks the ice with a memorable Alec Baldwin sample from the film Glengarry Glen Ross and then lets loose a fast-driving, melodic, punk-pop tune with honed hooks and even sharper commentary on the state of the Union: "National bankruptcy/ Circumcised society/ USA dined and ditched/ Fox reports 'poor is the new rich.'" “Suits And Ladders” also lambasts corporate America, and they continue to touch upon familiar topics of the band's lyrical cannon. “The Quitter,“ “First Call,” and “I Am An Alcoholic” hilariously perpetuate the drunk punk stereotype, while “Blasphemy (The Victimless Crime)” and “Best God In Show” rail against organized religion. But the real sidesplitters come with the pop culture references like “Creeping Out Sara,” a pointedly funny little ditty about getting drunk backstage and meeting either Tegan or Sara (he can’t remember). “Eddie, Bruce and Paul” is easily the funniest song here as it chronicles the breakup of Iron Maiden, replete with dueling guitarmonies and a horribly impersonated Bruce Dickenson falsetto.

EDITORS’ NOTES

On NOFX’s 11th studio long-player “We Called It America” breaks the ice with a memorable Alec Baldwin sample from the film Glengarry Glen Ross and then lets loose a fast-driving, melodic, punk-pop tune with honed hooks and even sharper commentary on the state of the Union: "National bankruptcy/ Circumcised society/ USA dined and ditched/ Fox reports 'poor is the new rich.'" “Suits And Ladders” also lambasts corporate America, and they continue to touch upon familiar topics of the band's lyrical cannon. “The Quitter,“ “First Call,” and “I Am An Alcoholic” hilariously perpetuate the drunk punk stereotype, while “Blasphemy (The Victimless Crime)” and “Best God In Show” rail against organized religion. But the real sidesplitters come with the pop culture references like “Creeping Out Sara,” a pointedly funny little ditty about getting drunk backstage and meeting either Tegan or Sara (he can’t remember). “Eddie, Bruce and Paul” is easily the funniest song here as it chronicles the breakup of Iron Maiden, replete with dueling guitarmonies and a horribly impersonated Bruce Dickenson falsetto.

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