25 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Back in 2004, hip-hop weirdoes Madlib and MF DOOM were two of the biggest names in the sprawling underground landscape. Madlib was the savant-like producer over at Stones Throw, creating an unending kaleidoscope of freaky beats and working with everyone from Dudley Perkins to Dilla, as well as on his own assorted alias projects like Quasimoto and Yesterday's New Quintet. DOOM was in the midst of an unlikely second-act career, with a fast-growing cult following and a slew of much-loved concept albums (Operation: Doomsday, Take Me to Your Leader, and Vaudeville Villain). When word hit that they were teaming up for a full-length, the news sent shockwaves through the global indie-rap community. The resulting album was a huge success, cracking the Billboard charts and winning universal praise from subterranean websites and mainstream press alike. Never at a loss for more beats, Madlib remixed the entire set for this sequel, released four years later. It's an impressive effort showcasing two of the most innovative and unpredictable artists in hip-hop history.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Back in 2004, hip-hop weirdoes Madlib and MF DOOM were two of the biggest names in the sprawling underground landscape. Madlib was the savant-like producer over at Stones Throw, creating an unending kaleidoscope of freaky beats and working with everyone from Dudley Perkins to Dilla, as well as on his own assorted alias projects like Quasimoto and Yesterday's New Quintet. DOOM was in the midst of an unlikely second-act career, with a fast-growing cult following and a slew of much-loved concept albums (Operation: Doomsday, Take Me to Your Leader, and Vaudeville Villain). When word hit that they were teaming up for a full-length, the news sent shockwaves through the global indie-rap community. The resulting album was a huge success, cracking the Billboard charts and winning universal praise from subterranean websites and mainstream press alike. Never at a loss for more beats, Madlib remixed the entire set for this sequel, released four years later. It's an impressive effort showcasing two of the most innovative and unpredictable artists in hip-hop history.

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