15 Songs, 54 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Boston Ska outfit Westbound Train are named after reggae’s most ubiquitous rhythms — the epic, Al Green-quoting Dennis Brown anthem of the same name — but they nonetheless began life as a somewhat typical third-wave ska outfit, performing energetic, but barely coherent riffs on classic Jamaican music overlaid with a uniquely punk brand of suburban disaffection. Westbound Train has matured considerably since its earliest releases and have, over time, evolved into an ensemble of crack instrumentalists with a surprisingly original take on Jamaican music. On Come and Get It Westbound Train sounds less like punks than a reggae-saturated analogue to accomplished soul & funk revisionists the El Michel’s Affair, ably charting out the musical spaces that connect reggae with American musical forms like bebop and funk.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Boston Ska outfit Westbound Train are named after reggae’s most ubiquitous rhythms — the epic, Al Green-quoting Dennis Brown anthem of the same name — but they nonetheless began life as a somewhat typical third-wave ska outfit, performing energetic, but barely coherent riffs on classic Jamaican music overlaid with a uniquely punk brand of suburban disaffection. Westbound Train has matured considerably since its earliest releases and have, over time, evolved into an ensemble of crack instrumentalists with a surprisingly original take on Jamaican music. On Come and Get It Westbound Train sounds less like punks than a reggae-saturated analogue to accomplished soul & funk revisionists the El Michel’s Affair, ably charting out the musical spaces that connect reggae with American musical forms like bebop and funk.

TITLE TIME

More By Westbound Train

You May Also Like