17 Songs, 1 Hour, 7 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

David Crowder makes a triumphant return here with his debut solo album, Neon Steeple. Any fears that this Christian music innovator would go into creative hibernation after the breakup of The David Crowder Band are more than dispelled by these exuberant, musically dazzling tracks. The unlikely fusion of folk, country, bluegrass, and electronica that Crowder innovated with his former group has here been refined and expanded. After opening with the acoustic “Neon Intro,” the album kicks into high gear with “My Beloved,” a banjo-driven hoedown punctuated by cries of joy. Tunes like “Ain’t No Grave” (a stomping folk shanty), “You Are” (a countrified raveup with pulsating synths), and “Lift Your Head Weary Sinner (Chains)” (a swampy excursion invoking the feel of a backwoods revival) match redemptive lyrics with ear-grabbing arrangements. Emmylou Harris lends her unmistakable vocals to the prayerful ballad “My Sweet Lord.” Whatever the sonic setting, Crowder holds tight to a worshipful message that culminates in the celebratory “All This Glory.” Neon Steeple inspires even as it compels you to dance.

EDITORS’ NOTES

David Crowder makes a triumphant return here with his debut solo album, Neon Steeple. Any fears that this Christian music innovator would go into creative hibernation after the breakup of The David Crowder Band are more than dispelled by these exuberant, musically dazzling tracks. The unlikely fusion of folk, country, bluegrass, and electronica that Crowder innovated with his former group has here been refined and expanded. After opening with the acoustic “Neon Intro,” the album kicks into high gear with “My Beloved,” a banjo-driven hoedown punctuated by cries of joy. Tunes like “Ain’t No Grave” (a stomping folk shanty), “You Are” (a countrified raveup with pulsating synths), and “Lift Your Head Weary Sinner (Chains)” (a swampy excursion invoking the feel of a backwoods revival) match redemptive lyrics with ear-grabbing arrangements. Emmylou Harris lends her unmistakable vocals to the prayerful ballad “My Sweet Lord.” Whatever the sonic setting, Crowder holds tight to a worshipful message that culminates in the celebratory “All This Glory.” Neon Steeple inspires even as it compels you to dance.

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0:34
4:24
4:06
3:14
3:44
4:49
5:09
2:05
4:02
4:04
3:42
3:31
6:57
1:27
4:51
5:17
5:26

About Crowder

Singer/guitarist David Crowder first stepped into the music industry when he realized that over half of the students at Baylor University, a Christian school that he attended in Waco, Texas, were not going to church. He began to actively recruit students for worship services and started writing songs to draw more young people in. He eventually started releasing the songs, leading to his debut album, 2002's Can You Hear Us? The album was released under the name the David Crowder Band, as Crowder was joined by guitarists Jack Parker and Jason Solley, drummer Jeremy Bush, bassist Mike Dodson, and electric violinist Mike Hogan. Their sophomore effort, Illuminate, appeared in the fall of 2003 and was followed a year later by The Lime CD, which comprised two earlier live releases (The Green CD and The Yellow CD) that had been given out to fans who had either pre-ordered prior albums or attended various CD release parties.

Sunsets & Sushi appeared in early 2005 before the band's next studio album, the bluegrass-tinged A Collision, was issued that fall. A spinoff of the latter album, entitled B Collision, came out a year later and focused even more on the group's delvings into bluegrass. Remedy was released in 2007, followed by Church Music in 2009. A four-song EP, Summer Happiness, featuring acoustic versions of songs from Church Music, appeared in 2010. Arriving in 2012, Give Us Rest; Or, A Requiem Mass in C (The Happiest of All Keys) was the David Crowder Band's sixth and final studio album. It was followed in 2014 by Crowder's solo debut, Neon Steeple, which was released under the moniker Crowder. The album was a major success for Crowder, topping the Christian chart and reaching number nine on the Billboard Top 200 as well as earning a Grammy nomination for his song "Come as You Are." He followed up in September 2016 with American Prodigal. ~ Bradley Torreano

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