11 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Almost immediately after Lil Peep’s 2017 death at age 21, his unreleased “16 Lines” video was shared on social media by producer and frequent collaborator Wiggy. The clip keeps a tight focus on Peep’s face as he takes hefty pulls from a blunt and sings lines like, “I wonder who you’ll f*ck when I die.” Sharing it was very likely a coping mechanism, Wiggy’s attempt to unite Peep fans in the wake of losing a person whose music articulated a very specific kind of helplessness in the face of depression—and who had articulated that helplessness regularly, blending his gift for emo melodies with hip-hop posturing and alt-rock song structure. “16 Lines” appears on Come Over When You’re Sober, Pt. 2, Peep’s second proper album, along with a bevy of other songs previously available only via assorted leaks. Across the album, talk of death is eerily frequent and allusions to excessive drug use are ubiquitous. Listening to Peep speak of his own morality and escaping the pain of existence isn’t easy. But in Come Over When You’re Sober, Pt. 2 producer Smokeasac, along with Peep’s family, has managed to put together a testament to the rapper’s refreshing originality and burgeoning greatness.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Almost immediately after Lil Peep’s 2017 death at age 21, his unreleased “16 Lines” video was shared on social media by producer and frequent collaborator Wiggy. The clip keeps a tight focus on Peep’s face as he takes hefty pulls from a blunt and sings lines like, “I wonder who you’ll f*ck when I die.” Sharing it was very likely a coping mechanism, Wiggy’s attempt to unite Peep fans in the wake of losing a person whose music articulated a very specific kind of helplessness in the face of depression—and who had articulated that helplessness regularly, blending his gift for emo melodies with hip-hop posturing and alt-rock song structure. “16 Lines” appears on Come Over When You’re Sober, Pt. 2, Peep’s second proper album, along with a bevy of other songs previously available only via assorted leaks. Across the album, talk of death is eerily frequent and allusions to excessive drug use are ubiquitous. Listening to Peep speak of his own morality and escaping the pain of existence isn’t easy. But in Come Over When You’re Sober, Pt. 2 producer Smokeasac, along with Peep’s family, has managed to put together a testament to the rapper’s refreshing originality and burgeoning greatness.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.
TITLE TIME

About Lil Peep

Emerging from the dark corners of the Internet's underground rap scene, Long Island musician Lil Peep attracted a sizable audience with his blend of hip-hop and rock influences. Born Gustav Ahr in the hamlet of Ronkonkoma, New York, he became a streaming sensation with his mixture of trap and elements of early-2000s punk and dream pop. With his gloomy and expressive lyrics -- along with a personal love of the two genres -- he attracted the "emo rap" label. However, while his influences ranged from Taking Back Sunday and My Chemical Romance to Gucci Mane, his sound more closely resembled that of Machine Gun Kelly and Yelawolf at their most introspective. Peep issued his debut mixtape, Lil Peep, Pt. 1, in 2015, quickly following by the Feelz EP and another mixtape, Live Forever. His breakthrough mixtapes, Crybaby and Hellboy, were released in 2016. The following year, he collaborated with Lil Tracy on a pair of Castles EPs. Tracy would return the favor on Peep's official debut LP, Come Over When You're Sober, Pt. 1, which featured the singles "The Brightside" and "Awful Things." Months after the album's release, Peep passed away on November 15, 2017. ~ Neil Z. Yeung

HOMETOWN
Ronkonkoma, NY
BORN
November 1, 1996

Songs

Albums

Videos