8 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Styx came of age in the mid-to-late ‘70s with a sound rooted in progressive rock and a destiny determined by pop. Their expert musicianship ensured they could gracefully shift from basic ballad melodrama to the climactic and bombastic heights of the most messianic arena rock. Nowhere is that more apparent than in The Grand Illusion’s centerpiece “Come Sail Away,” where for six minutes the group scale the dynamic range from a whisper to a scream. While the band certainly needed radio hits to raise their visibility and, therefore, fund their meticulous recording concepts, the group was never just about scoring the quick single. Each of their albums has an artistic ambition to transcend their previous limits. Each band member was a perfectionist. Newcomer Tommy Shaw slots his guitarwork in lockstep with old-hand James Young. Together, they harmonize and trade off polished guitar showcases that substantially expand the soundstage for “Fooling Yourself (The Angry Young Man),” “Superstars” and “Miss America,” raising the bar for all ‘70s mainstream rock acts.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Styx came of age in the mid-to-late ‘70s with a sound rooted in progressive rock and a destiny determined by pop. Their expert musicianship ensured they could gracefully shift from basic ballad melodrama to the climactic and bombastic heights of the most messianic arena rock. Nowhere is that more apparent than in The Grand Illusion’s centerpiece “Come Sail Away,” where for six minutes the group scale the dynamic range from a whisper to a scream. While the band certainly needed radio hits to raise their visibility and, therefore, fund their meticulous recording concepts, the group was never just about scoring the quick single. Each of their albums has an artistic ambition to transcend their previous limits. Each band member was a perfectionist. Newcomer Tommy Shaw slots his guitarwork in lockstep with old-hand James Young. Together, they harmonize and trade off polished guitar showcases that substantially expand the soundstage for “Fooling Yourself (The Angry Young Man),” “Superstars” and “Miss America,” raising the bar for all ‘70s mainstream rock acts.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
281 Ratings
281 Ratings
lrnzlndn ,

cha!

hey alaskan dude, totally agree with you! i really think this is a really underrated album, and styx is just underrated in general.

savo140295 ,

Don't Be Fooled

Many peole say that Styx only had one or two great songs. Don't be fooled. This album doesn't have one bad song on it. Every song is good, from the beginnung to the end. This is the kind of album that only has eight songs that people play over and over because each time you hear it it has a different meaning. The Styx put a lot of energy into their music and it makes it really fun to listen to. This is a great album that is timeless. A great buy

Sned ,

Castle Walls !!!

The BEST song Styx ever released. Too bad the rest of this CD has been airplayed to death. I'd rather hear Cartman sing Come Sail Away...... To be fair, this is {was} a great album when it came out. Not a bad cut on it. I've just heard it so many times in my life , that I'm kinda tired of it. Still, Castle Walls and Man in the Wilderness are on my Ipod under Favorites.

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